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Norma Zimmer, 'Lawrence Welk Show' soloist, dies 87

Norma Zimmer (July 13, 1923 – May 10, 2011) was a vocalist, best remembered for her 22-year tenure as Lawrence Welk's "Champagne Lady" on The Lawrence Welk Show.

Zimmer sang with a quartet called The Girlfriends along with Betty Allan and others. They sang backup for Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Perry Como, and others. Their coup was to be hired as backup for the famous Bing Crosby version of Irving Berlin's "White Christmas".

As her two sons were growing up, she decided to give it up to raise her children. Welk told her it was all right for her to quit the road tours, but he asked her to stay on the television show until he could find another singer. Each week, a new girl came on as a possible replacement, but Welk kept asking Zimmer to come back the following week. That went on for 20 years. As the show's Champagne Lady, Zimmer sang one solo and often a duet (usually with Jimmy Roberts); she frequently danced with Welk at the end of the show.

Norma Zimmer Cause of Death
Norma Zimmer stopped performing publicly since she was suffering from a neurological disorder. She died peacefully on May 10, 2011 at her Brea, California home.
Norma Zimmer was 87 years old at the time of her death. She was survived by her two sons, Ron and Mark, as well as three grand children.

Norma Zimmer on The Lawrence Welk Show: Hold Me, Thrill Me
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Dreamin' of a White Christmas on the Welk Show
1972, Norma Zimmer and Jimmy Roberts

Movie and Commercial Director Howard Zieff dies 81

Howard Zieff (October 21, 1927 Los Angeles - February 22, 2009 Los Angeles) was an American director, television commercial director, and advertising photographer.

Zieff's films include The Main Event (1979), Private Benjamin (1980), Unfaithfully Yours (1984), The Dream Team (1989), My Girl (1991) and My Girl 2 (1994).

Zieff retired from directing after My Girl 2 was released as he became increasingly debilitated by Parkinson's disease.

Death of Howard Zieff
Zieff passed away at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles at 8:10am on Sunday, February 22, his wife (renowned retired motion picture literary agent) Ronda Gomez-Quinones at his side.

Zieff grew up in Boyle Heights. He studied art for one year at Los Angeles City College, then dropped out in 1946 to join the United States Navy. He learned photography at the Naval Photography School in Pensacola, Florida and then, after his discharge, at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He became a commercial photographer in New York City in the 1950s, soon earning a reputation as one one of the city's best-known advertising photographers of the 1960s. His campaigns included "You Don't Have To Be Jewish" for Levy's rye bread, "Mamma Mia, that's a spicy meatball" for Alka-Seltzer, and ads for the New York Daily News, Polaroid, and Volkswagen.

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