Major Causes of Death: Accidental | Cancer | Drug | Heart Attack | Heart Failure | Lung | Natural Causes | Suicide

Sports

Arnold Palmer, Golf Legend, Dies 87

Arnold Daniel Palmer (September 10, 1929 – September 25, 2016) was an American professional golfer, who is generally regarded as one of the greatest players in professional golf history. He won numerous events on both the PGA Tour and Champions Tour, dating back to 1955. Nicknamed "The King", he was one of golf's most popular stars and its most important trailblazer, because he was the first superstar of the sport's television age, which began in the 1950s.

Palmer died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on September 25, 2016.

Muhammad Ali, 'The Greatest,' dies 74

Muhammad Ali (Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., January 17, 1942 – June 3, 2016) was an American professional boxer, generally considered the greatest heavyweight in the history of the sport. Early in his career, Ali was known for being an inspiring, controversial and polarizing figure both inside and outside the boxing ring. He is one of the most recognized sports figures of the past 100 years, crowned "Sportsman of the Century" by Sports Illustrated and "Sports Personality of the Century" by the BBC. He also wrote several best-selling books about his career, including The Greatest: My Own Story and The Soul of a Butterfly.

Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson's syndrome in 1984, a disease that commonly results from head trauma from activities such as boxing.

Ali was hospitalized on June 2, 2016 with a respiratory condition. His condition was initially described as "fair". The following day, Ali's condition worsened, and he was placed on life support. His condition did not improve, and late on June 3, it was announced that Ali had died at the age of 74.

Flip Saunders, NBA, Timberwolves coach, dies 60

Philip Daniel "Flip" Saunders (February 23, 1955 – October 25, 2015) was an American basketball player and coach. During his career he coached the Minnesota Timberwolves, Detroit Pistons and Washington Wizards.

MBA History
1995–2005     Minnesota Timberwolves
2005–2008     Detroit Pistons
2009–2012     Washington Wizards
2014–2015     Minnesota Timberwolves

Flip Saunders cause of death and illness.

On August 11, 2015, it was announced that Saunders was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma (cancer from blood). He declared in August that he was being treated for this disease. Doctors considered it "very treatable and curable" and Saunders at the time said he planned to remain the Timberwolves' head coach and president of basketball operations. However, after being hospitalized following a setback in September, it was announced that he would miss the entire 2015–16 NBA season.

Saunders died on October 25, 2015, at age 60.

Flip Saunders Gets Ejected vs Celtics - ( 1-02-2012 )

Yogi Berra, Hall of Fame Yankees catcher, dies 90

Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra (May 12, 1925 – September 22, 2015) was an American professional baseball catcher, manager, and coach who played 19 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) (1946–63, 1965), all but the last for the New York Yankees. An 18-time All-Star and 10-time World Series champion as a player, Berra had a career batting average of .285, while compiling 358 home runs and 1,430 runs batted in. He is one of only five players to win the American League Most Valuable Player Award three times. Widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in baseball history, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972.

Yogi-isms

Berra was also well known for his pithy comments, malapropisms, and witticisms, known as Yogi-isms, such as "It ain't over till it's over."

Yogi Berra Cause of Death

Yogi Berra died of natural causes during his sleep at an assisted living facility in West Caldwell, New Jersey, on September 22, 2015—69 years to the day after his MLB debut.

Tommy Morrison, Ex-heavyweight champion, Rocky V, dies 44

Tommy David Morrison (January 2, 1969 – September 1, 2013) was an American heavyweight boxer and a former World Boxing Organization champion. He lost only three out of a total of 52 professional fights. Morrison's nickname, "The Duke," is based on being a grandnephew of Hollywood star John Wayne. Morrison was a co-star with Sylvester Stallone in the 1990 boxing movie Rocky V.

Morrison's professional boxing career ended in 2008, 12 years after he tested positive for HIV in 1996. Beginning in 2006, Morrison attempted a comeback after a 10-year hiatus, stating that his HIV diagnosis was negative.

Morrison had multiple convictions for driving under the influence, assault, and drugs and weapons charges.

Rocky V

In 1989, actor Sylvester Stallone observed one of Morrison's bouts. Stallone arranged a script reading and cast Morrison in the movie Rocky V as Tommy "The Machine" Gunn, a young and talented protege of the retired Rocky Balboa. Originally an admirer of Rocky, Gunn's successes led him to goad Rocky into a street fight.

Tommy Morrison cause of death

In August 2013, ESPN reported that Morrison was critically ill and had been bedridden for over a year.

On September 1, 2013, Morrison died at a hospital in Omaha, Nebraska. His family did not disclose the cause of death.  Tommy Morrison was 44 years old at the time of his death.

Tommy Morrison KO's

Ossie Schectman, who scored first points in NBA history, dies 94

Oscar Benjamin "Ossie" Schectman (March 30, 1919 – July 30, 2013) was an American professional basketball player. He is credited with having scored the very first basket in the National Basketball Association (NBA), at that time the Basketball Association of America.

On November 1, 1946, in the first ever game of the Basketball Association of America (BAA), Schectman made the opening basket for the New York Knicks against the Toronto Huskies at Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens. The Knicks won the game 68–66. In 1949, the BAA became the National Basketball Association (NBA); thus, Schectman's basket is considered the first in NBA history.

In 1946–47 (his only year in the NBA), Schectman played in 54 games for the Knicks and was third in the league with 2.0 assists per game.

Ossie Schectman cause of death

Ossie Schectman died at age 94 in Delray Beach, Florida.

Joe Weider, bodybuilding & fitness icon, dies 93

joe

joeJosef Edwin "Joe" Weider (November 29, 1920 – March 23, 2013) was the co-founder of the International Federation of BodyBuilders (IFBB) along with brother Ben Weider and creator of the Mr. Olympia, the Ms. Olympia and the Masters Olympia bodybuilding contests. He was the publisher of several bodybuilding and fitness-related magazines, most notably Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Men's Fitness and Shape, and the manufacturer of a line of fitness equipment and fitness supplements. In 1995, he appeared in the Charlton Heston and Peter Graves film, America: A Call to Greatness, directed by Warren Chaney.

Joe Weider created Weider Nutrition in 1940, considered the first sports nutrition company. Now called Schiff Nutrition International, they were the creators of Tiger's Milk nutrition bars and related products, one of the earliest lines of sports foods.

On Labor Day 2006, California governor and seven times Mr. Olympia winner Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Weider protégé, presented him with the Venice Muscle Beach Hall of Fame's Lifetime Achievement award. Schwarzenegger credited Weider with inspiring him to enter bodybuilding and to come to the United States.

Joe Weider cause of death

Joe Weider died of heart failure on March 23, 2013 at his home in Los Angeles, California.  Joe Weider was 92 years old at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife Betty.

Kyle Bennett, Three-time BMX world champion, dies 33

Kyle Bennett (September 25, 1979 – October 14, 2012) was an American professional "New/Current School" Bicycle Motocross (BMX) racer and Dirt Jumper. He competed for 2008 Summer Olympics.

Kyle Bennett cause of death
In the early hours of October 14, 2012, Bennett's 2006 Toyota Tundra pickup truck went off the road while traveling at high speed. The truck smashed through a culvert pipe, a wrought-iron gate, and several other objects before coming to rest upside down. Responding EMTs extracted Bennett from the vehicle, and later pronounced him dead at the scene. Officials said he was not wearing a seat belt.

Kyle Bennett was 33 years old at the time of his death.

Kyle Bennett riding for USA in BMX World Championships 2012

Carroll Shelby, Legendary car designer, racer, dies 89

Carroll Hall Shelby (January 11, 1923 – May 10, 2012) was an American automotive designer and racing driver. He was most well known for making the AC Motors-based Shelby American Cobra and later the Mustang-based performance cars for Ford Motor Company known as Mustang Cobras which he has done since 1965. His company, Shelby American Inc., founded in 1962, currently sells modified Ford vehicles, as well as performance parts.

He was Sports Illustrated's driver of the year in 1956 and 1957.

He competed in Formula One from 1958 to 1959, participating in a total of eight World Championship races and several non-championship races.

He was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1991, and the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 1992.

Carroll Shelby cause of death
Carroll Shelby's cause of death was not disclosed.
Carroll Shelby was 89 years old at the time of his death.

Junior Seau, NFL great, died in apparent suicide 43

Tiaina Baul "Junior" Seau, Jr., (January 19, 1969 – May 2, 2012) was an American football linebacker. A ten-time All-Pro and 12-time Pro Bowl selection, Seau was a member of the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team.

He played college football at the University of Southern California and was the progenitor of the "NFL-USC linebacker". He was drafted fifth overall by the San Diego Chargers during the 1990 NFL Draft, later played for the Miami Dolphins and New England Patriots, and retired from pro football in 2010.

Personsl
Seau survived with minor injuries a 100-foot fall down a cliff in his SUV in October 2010; he said he had fallen asleep at the wheel. Hours earlier he was arrested for domestic violence after his girlfriend reported an incident to the police. He was never charged.

Junior Seau cause of death
On May 2, 2012, Seau was found dead by his girlfriend at his home in Oceanside, California, with a gunshot wound to the chest that was ruled a suicide by the San Diego County medical examiner's office.

Seau's family decided to allow researchers to study his brain for possible damage due to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a condition traced to concussion-related brain damage with depression as a symptom.

Sarah Burke, Canadian Freestyle Skier, Olympic Hopeful, dies 29

Sarah Burke (September 3, 1982 – January 19, 2012) was a Canadian freestyle skier who was a pioneer of the superpipe event. She was a four-time Winter X Games gold medalist, and won the world championship in the halfpipe in 2005. She successfully lobbied the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to have the event added to the Olympic program for the 2014 Winter Olympics. She was considered a medal favourite in the event. 

Sarah Burke cause of death
Sarah Burkedied following a training accident in Utah.
Sarah Burke was 29 years old at the time of her death.

Accident
On January 10, 2012 Burke was seriously injured while training on the Park City Mountain Resort Eagle superpipe in Park City, Utah. This is the same superpipe where snowboarder Kevin Pearce was seriously injured in 2009. Onlookers reported that Burke had completed a trick fairly well yet fell onto her head, and the accident did not appear to be very severe. Moments later, however, she went into cardiac arrest while still on the ski slope, making her chance of survival extremely low. She was resuscitated and airlifted to the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City, where she was reported to be in a coma. The following day, she underwent neurosurgery to repair a tear in a vertebral artery. She succumbed to her injuries on January 19, 2012. Per her publicist's words, Burke's injuries had resulted in "irreversible damage to her brain due to lack of oxygen and blood after cardiac arrest." Her organs and tissues were donated as she requested before her death.

etalk Sarah Burke at Whistler World Ski Fest

Smokin' Joe Frazier, Former Heavyweight Boxing Champion, Dies 67

Joseph William "Joe" Frazier (January 12, 1944 – November 7, 2011), also known as Smokin' Joe, was a former Olympic and Undisputed World Heavyweight boxing champion, whose professional career lasted from 1965 to 1976, with a brief comeback in 1981.

Frazier emerged as the top contender in the late 1960s, defeating the likes of Jerry Quarry, Oscar Bonavena, Buster Mathis, Eddie Machen, Doug Jones, George Chuvalo and Jimmy Ellis en route to becoming undisputed heavyweight champion in 1970, and followed up by defeating Muhammad Ali on points in the highly-anticipated "Fight of the Century" in 1971. Two years later Frazier lost his title when he was knocked out by George Foreman. He fought on, beating Joe Bugner, losing a rematch to Ali, and beating Quarry and Ellis again.

He is an inductee of both the International Boxing Hall of Fame and the World Boxing Hall of Fame.

Joe Frazier cause of death
Joe Frazier was diagnosed with liver cancer in late September 2011 and admitted to hospice care and died November 7, 2011.  Joe Frazier was 67 years old at the time of his death.

Dan Wheldon, Indy 500 champion, dies after crash 33

Daniel Clive "Dan" Wheldon (June 22, 1978 – October 16, 2011) was an English auto racing driver. He was the 2005 Indy Racing League IndyCar Series champion, and winner of the Indianapolis 500 in 2005 and 2011. Wheldon died during a racing accident at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on 16 October 2011, at the age of 33.

Dan Wheldon cause of death
DeathAt the 2011 IZOD IndyCar Series season finale at Las Vegas Motor Speedway on 16 October 2011, Wheldon was involved in a 15-car accident during lap 11 of the race. The massive pile-up resulted in a red flag. Wheldon had to be extricated from his car and was airlifted to a local hospital with what were described as "serious injuries." He subsequently succumbed to his injuries. He was 33 years old.

Dan Wheldon's Last Tweet Before Race

Michael Flanagan, Baltimore Orioles, Cy Youung winner, commits suicide 59

Michael Kendall Flanagan (December 16, 1951 – August 24, 2011) was an American left-handed pitcher, front office executive, and color commentator. With the exception of four years with the Toronto Blue Jays (1987–1990), he was most associated with the Baltimore Orioles during almost all of his time in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Career highlights and awards

  • All-Star (1978)
  • World Series champion (1983)
  • 1979 AL Cy Young Award
  • 1979 AL TSN Pitcher of the Year

Michael Flanagan cause of death
On August 24, 2011 police discovered a body on his property but could not immediately determine the identity because the wounds were so severe. The body was later identified as Flanagan, with the cause of death determined to be a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the head. Police said that Flanagan was distressed about financial issues. WBAL-TV reported that Flanagan was still despondent by perceived failures during his tenure in the Orioles' front office.

Hideki Irabu, ex Yankees's pitcher, found dead by hanging 42

Hideki Irabu (May 5, 1969 – July 27, 2011) was a professional baseball player of Okinawan and American mixed ancestry. He played professionally in both Japan and the United States.

Irabu made his highly publicized debut in The US on July 10, 1997.  He played with the Yankees from 1997 through 1999, winning two World Series rings (1998, 1999).  1998 was Irabu's best season in MLB, featuring career bests in games started (28), complete games (2), innings pitched (173), wins (13), and ERA (4.06).

After the 1999 season, he was traded to the Montreal Expos. He started only 14 games for the Expos in 2000 and 2001. In 2002, he signed as a free agent to pitch for the Texas Rangers as a closer. At the end of the year, Irabu moved back to Japan.

Hideki Irabu cause of death
Hideki Irabu was found dead in his home near Los Angeles on July 27, 2011 in an apparent suicide by hanging.

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