Soul singer Dee Dee Warwick (Dionne's sister) dies 63

Dee Dee Warwick (September 25, 1945 - October 18, 2008), was an African-American soul singer. She was born Newark, New Jersey as Delia Mae Warrick. Following the example of her elder sister, Dionne Warwick, she changed her surname from Warrick to Warwick in the early 1960s.

She is best-known for her hits during the 1960s, including the #13 R&B hit I'm Gonna Make You Love Me, co-written by Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff and later covered by Diana Ross & the Supremes, The Temptations, and Play. She is also a two time Grammy nominee for "Foolish Fool" and "She Didn't Know".

Recordings of both her Mercury Records years and her Atco years are available on CD and hopefully her RCA, Kama Sutra, Heritage and Private Stock Records will follow. In late 2006 Dee Dee returned to much success singing background for Dionne in concert and also was part of the "Family First" song in the Tyler Perry movie and soundtrack for "Daddy's Little Girls"

In January 2008 Dee Dee is featured in the title song from Dionne's gospel album "Why We Sing" and was continuing background work with her sister

In February 2008, Dee Dee continued her background vocals for Dionne's one woman show "My Music and Me" in Europe.

Warwick was the niece of gospel singer Cissy Houston and a cousin of Whitney Houston

Dee Dee Warwick - I'll Be Better Off...

Dee Dee Warwick's discography on next page 

Chart singles
1963: You're No Good (Jubilee) (#117 US) - The original recording of this song. It was later covered by Betty Everett, The Swinging Blue Jeans and Linda Ronstadt, all of whom had hits with it.
1965: Do It With All Your Heart (Blue Rock) (#124 US)
1965: We're Doing Fine (Blue Rock) (#96 US, #28 R&B)
1966: I Want To Be With You (Mercury) (#41 US, #9 R&B)
1966: I'm Gonna Make You Love Me (Mercury) (#88 US, #13 R&B) - The original recording of this song. Later jointly covered by Diana Ross & The Supremes and The Temptations, who took it to the US top 10.
1967: When Love Slips Away (Mercury) (#92 US, #43 R&B)
1969: That's Not Love (Mercury) (#106 US, #42 R&B)
1969: Ring of Bright Water (Mercury) (#113 US)
1969: Foolish Fool (Mercury) (#57 US, #14 R&B)
1970: She Didn't Know (She Kept On Talking) (Atco) (#70 US, #9 R&B)
1970: Cold Night In Georgia (Atco) (#44 R&B)
1971: Suspicious Minds (Atco) (#80 US, #24 R&B)
1975: Get Out Of My Life (Private Stock) (#73 R&B)

Kingston Trio's Nick Reynolds, folk singer dies 75

Nick Reynolds is the father of folk songs, paved the way for Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Nick Reynolds (July 27, 1933 San Diego, California - October 1, 2008 San Diego, California) American folk musician and recording artist. One of the founding members of The Kingston Trio group, whose largely folk-based material captured international attention during the late fifties and early sixties.

Death of Nick Reynolds
Nick Reynolds died on October 1, 2008, in San Diego, CA
Nick Reynoldswas 75 years old at the time of his death

Nick Reynolds lived the last years of his life comfortably and well in Coronado, California with his wife Leslie. For eight years, Nick joined John Stewart to do a “Trio” fantasy camp in Scottsdale, Arizona. In addition to a dinner with a question and answer session, fantasy campers joined Reynolds and Stewart on stage to perform a song, becoming for that one moment a member of a "Kingston Trio," the group whose contributions to folk, pop, and world music constitute Nick Reynolds' musical legacy.

Nick Reynolds' biography continues next page

The man who never returned

Growing up in Coronado Island, California, his passions as a kid growing up were tennis, skin-diving and singing with his family. His father, a Navy captain, was an avid guitar player who brought back songs from his travels around the world. He taught Nick the guitar and ukulele, and the family spent many nights singing and harmonizing for pure enjoyment. Nick enrolled in Menlo College in 1954 as a business major, and met Bob Shane in an accounting class. They soon started hanging out, drinking, and chasing women together, and this, in turn, led to playing music, initially as a way of being popular at parties -- Shane's guitar and Reynolds' bongos became a fixture at local frat gatherings, and after a few weeks of this, Shane introduced Reynolds to Dave Guard.

Shane returned to Hawaii for a time to work for his father's sporting goods company. Guard and Reynolds began playing with Joe Gannon on bass and singer Barbara Bogue, and became Dave Guard & the Calypsonians. Reynolds then left for a time following his graduation and was replaced by Don McArthur in a group that was known as the Kingston Quartet, and in a resulting shuffle, Reynolds and Shane (back all the way from Hawaii) were brought back into the group, now rechristened the Kingston Trio. Their initial approach to music was determined by the skills that each member brought or, more accurately, didn't bring to the trio -- Nick Reynolds sang a third above the melody, swapped his ukulele for a tenor guitar, and his bongos for a conga drum. Reynolds provided the group with an ebullient vocal style, superb harmonizing, and an ability to convey tender lyrics with a touching intimacy. The trio disbanded in 1967 but was revived in the seventies under the direction of original member Bob Shane, and continues to the present although Shane retired from performing in 2004. When the Trio disbanded, Nick moved to Oregon where he spent twenty years ranching and raising 4 children.

In 1981 the Trio reunited, featuring Bob Shane, Nick Reynolds, Dave Guard, John Stewart, George Grove, Roger Gambill. A PBS Reunion Special DVD was recorded, hosted by Tommy Smothers and featuring special guest Mary Travers. In 1983, Nick Reynolds collaborated with John Stewart and Lindsey Buckingham on a new album/CD "Revenge of The Budgie" with seven new recordings.

In the mid-eighties Reynolds moved back to California and rejoined the Trio in 1987/1988. He sang and played with them happily for another 11 years, then retired for the second time in December, 1999. Folk Music Archives interviewed the Trio in San Antonio and New York City when Nick Reynolds, a founding 1958 member performed his last full-time performance with the group during a concert with the San Antonio Symphony.

Vivien Leigh's stunt double in "Gone With the Wind" dies 93

Hazel Warp (1914 – August 26, 2008) was an American stuntwoman. She was Vivien Leigh's stunt double in Gone with the Wind. Warp rode and trained horses in the film, was a Leigh's stand-in in all of her horseback-riding scenes. She also tumbled down the stairs in the famous scene near the end of the film where Scarlett O'Hara loses her balance and falls. Other films she appeared in included Wuthering Heights, Ben-Hur and National Velvet. She was born in Harlowton, Montana and was twice married. She died August 26, 2008 in Livingston Memorial Hospital, Montana aged 93

Johnny Griffin - Jazz saxophonist, Fastest sax player 80

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Dead Sax PlayerJohn Arnold Griffin III (April 24, 1928 – July 25, 2008) was an American bop and hard bop tenor saxophonist.

Death of Johnny Griffin
Johnny Griffin died in Availles-Limouzine, France, where he had lived for the past 24 years.
Johnny Griffin was 80 years old at the time of his death.
Cause of death is unknown for now.  Griffin's wife Miriam found him dead before he was due to give a concert.

Johnny Griffin's last concert was July 21, 2008, in Hyères, France.

Early life and education
Griffin studied music at DuSable High School under Walter Dyett, starting out on clarinet before moving on to oboe and then alto sax. While still at high school at age 15, Griffin was playing with T-Bone Walker in a band led by Walker's brother.

* Johnny Griffin's biography & discography continues next page
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Johnny Griffin's Sax Solo

Early career
Alto sax was still his instrument of choice when he joined Lionel Hampton's big band three days after his high school graduation, but Hampton encouraged him to take up the tenor, playing alongside Arnett Cobb. He first appeared on a Los Angeles recording with Hampton's band in 1945 at the age of 17.

In 1947, Griffin and fellow Hampton band member Joe Morris formed a sextet, where he remained for the next two years. His playing can be heard on various early Rhythm and Blues recordings for Atlantic Records. By 1951 Griffin was playing baritone sax in an R&B sextet led by former bandmate Arnett Cobb.

After returning to Chicago from two years in the Army, Griffin began establishing a reputation as one of the premiere saxophonists in that city. Thelonious Monk enthusiastically encouraged Orrin Keepnews of Riverside Records to sign the young tenor, but before he could act Blue Note Records had signed Griffin.

He joined Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers in 1957, and his recordings from that time include a memorable album joining together the Messengers and Thelonious Monk. Griffin then succeeded John Coltrane as a member of Monk's Five Spot quartet; he can be heard on the album "Thelonious Monk at the Five Spot."

As leader of his own band, his first Blue Note album Introducing Johnny Griffin in 1956, also featuring Wynton Kelly on piano, Curly Russell on bass and Max Roach on drums, brought him critical acclaim.

A 1957 Blue Note album A Blowing Session featured him with fellow tenor players John Coltrane and Hank Mobley. He played with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers for a few months in 1957, and in the Thelonious Monk Sextet and Quartet (1958). During this period, he recorded a set with Clark Terry on Serenade To a Bus Seat featuring the rhythm trio of Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones.

At this stage in his career, Griffin was known as the "fastest tenor in the west", for the ease with which he could execute fast note runs with excellent intonation.

Subsequent to his three albums for Blue Note, Griffin did not get along with the label's house engineer Rudy Van Gelder, he recorded for the Riverside label.

From 1960 to 1962 he and Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis led their own quintet, recording several albums together.

Move to Europe
He went to live in France in 1963, moving to the Netherlands in 1978. Apart from appearing regularly under his own name at jazz clubs such as London's Ronnie Scott's, Griffin became the "first choice" sax player for visiting US musicians touring the continent during the 60s and 70s. He briefly rejoined Monk's groups (an Octet and Nonet) in 1967.

Griffin and Davis met up again in 1970 and recorded Tough Tenors Again 'n' Again, and again with the Dizzy Gillespie Big 7 at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In 1965 he recorded some albums with Wes Montgomery. From 1967 to 1969, he formed part of The Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band, and in the late 70s, recorded with Peter Herbolzheimer And His Big Band, which also included, among others, Nat Adderley, Derek Watkins, Art Farmer, Slide Hampton, Jiggs Whigham, Herb Geller, Wilton Gaynair, Stan Getz, Gerry Mulligan, Rita Reys, Jean "Toots" Thielemans, Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen, Grady Tate, and Quincy Jones as arranger. He also recorded with the Nat Adderley Quintet in 1978, having previously recorded with Adderley in 1958.

His last concert, July 21, 2008 was played in Hyères, France. Johnny Griffin died in Availles-Limouzine, France, where he had lived for the past 24 years.

Selected discography
Introducing Johnny Griffin (1956)
A Blowing Session (1957)
The Congregation (1957)
Johnny Griffin Sextet (1958)
The Little Giant (1959)
The Big Soul Band (1960)
White Gardenia (1961; Riverside Records)
The Kerry Dancers and Other Swinging Folk (1961)
Tough Tenor Favourites (1962)
Grab This! (1962)
The Man I Love (1967)
Tough Tenors Again 'n' Again, with Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis (1970)
Bush Dance (1978)
That Old Feeling (Rita Reys, Trio Pim Jacobs ft. Johnny Griffin (1979)
Take My Hand (1988)
The Cat (1990)
Dance of Passion (1992)
Johnny Griffin/Steve Grossman Quintet (2000)

Larry Harmon, Bozo the Clown, dies at 83

Larry Harmon (January 2, 1925 - July 3, 2008) was an American entertainer, best-known as Bozo the Clown.

Together with a group of investors, Harmon purchased the licensing rights to the Bozo character from Capitol Records. Harmon marketed the Bozo property aggressively. By the late 1950's Harmon had created local Bozo TV shows in nearly every major U.S. market, and across the world in places as far away as Thailand, Greece and Brazil.

Yves Saint-Laurent - legendary fashion designer dies 71

Yves Saint Laurent accessoriesYves Saint Laurent bookYves Saint Laurent memorabilia
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Yves Saint LaurentYves Henri Donat Dave Mathieu-Saint-Laurent (August 1, 1936 – June 1, 2008) was a French pied noir fashion designer, and was considered among the greatest of the 20th century.

Death of Yves Saint-Laurent
He died on June 1, 2008, in his home in Paris of a long-term illness

The son of an insurance company president, Yves Saint-Laurent was born on 1 August 1936 in Oran, in what was then French Algeria. Saint Laurent left home at the age of 17 to work for the French designer Christian Dior. Following Dior's death in 1957, Yves, at the age of 22, was put in charge of the effort of saving the Dior house from financial ruin.

Shortly after this success, he was conscripted to serve in the French army during the Algerian War of Independence. After 20 days, the stress of being hazed by fellow soldiers led the fragile Saint Laurent to be institutionalized in a French mental hospital, where he underwent psychiatric treatment, including electroshock therapy, for a nervous breakdown.

In 1962, in the wake of his nervous breakdown, Saint Laurent was released from Dior and started his own label, YSL, financed by his companion, Pierre Bergé. The couple split romantically in 1976 but remained business partners. During the 1960s and 1970s, the firm popularized fashion trends such as the beatnik look, safari jackets for men and women, tight pants and tall, thigh-high boots, including the creation of arguably the most famous classic tuxedo suit for women in 1966, Le Smoking suit. He also started mainstreaming the idea of wearing silhouettes from the 1920s, '30s and '40s. He was the first, in 1966, to popularize ready-to-wear in an attempt to democratize fashion, with Rive Gauche and the boutique of the same name. He was also the first designer to use black models in his runway shows. Among his muses were Loulou de la Falaise, the daughter of a French marquis and an Anglo-Irish fashion model; Betty Catroux, the half-Brazilian daughter of an American diplomat and wife of a French decorator; Talitha Pol-Getty, who died of drug overdose in 1971; Catherine Deneuve, the iconic French actress; and the Guinean-born Senegalese supermodel Katoucha Niane, the daughter of writer Djibril Tamsir Niane. Ambassador to the couturier during the late 1970s and early 80s was London socialite millionairess Diane Boulting-Casserley Vandelli, making the brand ever more popular amongst the European jet-set and upper classes.

In 1983, he became the first living fashion designer to be honored by the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In 2001, he was awarded the rank of Commander of the Légion d'Honneur by French president Jacques Chirac.

Saint Laurent retired in 2002 and became increasingly reclusive. From then until his death he spent much of his time at his house in Marrakech, Morocco.

He also created a foundation with Pierre Bergé in Paris to trace the history of the house of YSL, complete with 15,000 objects and 5,000 pieces of clothing.


John Phillip Law - Actor dies 70

John Phillip Law (September 7, 1937 – May 13, 2008) was an American film actor, with more than a hundred movie roles to his credit. He was the son of actress Phyllis Sallee, and the brother of actor Thomas Augustus Law.

He is best known for his roles as the blind angel Pygar in the science fiction classic Barbarella, and as news anchor Robin Stone in The Love Machine. (The latter reteamed him with Alexandra Hay, his costar from the 1968 "acid comedy" Skidoo.)

Besides Barbarella, a few of Law's movies have become cult classics, including Danger: Diabolik, The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, Death Rides a Horse, Attack Force Z, and The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming. 

Death of John Phillip Law
Cause of death is not known,  John Phillip Law was 70 years old at the time of his death

Death Rides a Hourse - US Film Trailer

Eddy Arnold - Country Music Legend dies 89

Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918 – May 8, 2008) was an American country music singer who was second to George Jones in the number of individual hits on the country charts but, according to a formula derived by Joel Whitburn, is the all-time leader in an overall ranking for hits and their time on the charts. From 1945 through 1983 he had 145 charted songs, including 28 number-one hits.

Death of Eddy Arnold
Eddy performed his final concert on May 16, 1999 (the day after his 81st birthday) at the Hotel Orleans in Las Vegas. He married the former Sally Gayhart in November of 1942. She preceded him in death in March of 2008 following hip replacement surgery. The couple were the parents of a son and a daughter, "Dickie" and Jo Ann. Arnold died on May 8, 2008 in Nashville, Tennessee. Both Eddy and Sally were survived at the times of their deaths by their children, "Dickie" and Jo Ann, as well as two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren

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  • Eddy Arnold's biography continues next page

Eddy Arnold biography

Early years
Born Richard Edward Arnold in Henderson, Tennessee, he made his first radio appearance in 1936. During his childhood, he lost both his father and the family farm. When he turned 18 he left home to try to make his mark in the music world.

Arnold's formative musical years included early struggles to gain recognition until he landed a job as the lead male vocalist for the Pee Wee King band. By 1943, Arnold had become a solo star on the Grand Ole Opry. He was then signed by RCA Victor. In December of 1944, he cut his first record. Although all of his early records sold well, his initial big hit did not come until 1946 with "That's How Much I Love You." In common with many other country and western singers of the time, he had a folksy nickname: "The Tennessee Plowboy."

Managed by Col. Tom Parker (who later went on to control the career of Elvis Presley), Arnold began to dominate country music. In 1947-48 he had 13 of the top 20 songs. He successfully made the transition from radio to television, appearing frequently in the new medium. In 1955, he upset many in the country music establishment by going to New York to record with the Hugo Winterhalter Orchestra. The pop-oriented arrangements of "Cattle Call" and "The Richest Man (In the World)", however, helped to expand his appeal beyond its country base.

With the advent of rock and roll, Arnold's record sales dipped in the late 1950s. Along with RCA Victor label-mate Jim Reeves, he continued to try to court a wider audience by using pop-sounding, string-laced arrangements, a style that would come to be known as the Nashville sound.

Second career
After Jerry Purcell became his manager in 1964, Arnold embarked on a "second career" that surpassed the success of the first one. In the process, he succeeded in his ambition of carrying his music to a more diverse audience. Already recorded by several other artists, "Make The World Go Away" was just another song until recorded by Arnold. Under the direction of producer Chet Atkins, and showcased by Bill Walker's arrangement and the talents of the Anita Kerr Singers and pianist Floyd Cramer, Arnold's rendition of "Make the World Go Away" became an international hit.

Bill Russell's precise, intricate arrangements provided the lush background for 16 straight Arnold hits through the late 1960s. Arnold started performing with symphony orchestras in virtually every major city. New Yorkers jammed prestigious Carnegie Hall for two concerts. Arnold appeared before the Hollywood crowd at the Coconut Grove and had long, sold-out engagements in Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe.

After having recorded for RCA Victor since the 1940s, Arnold left the label to record four albums for MGM Records in the 1970s, posting one hit ("If The Whole World Stopped Lovin' "). He then successfully returned to RCA Victor with both the album Eddy, and the hit single "Cowboy", which evoked stylistic memories of his classic "Cattle Call." After a few more RCA releases, he retired from active singing; however, he did release a new RCA album, After All These Years in 2005 at the age of 87.

Reasons for success
There are several reasons for Arnold's great success. From the beginning he stood out from his contemporaries in the world of country singers. He never wore gaudy, glittering outfits. He sang from his diaphragm, not through his nose. He avoided the standard honky-tonk themes, preferring instead to sing songs that explored the intricacies of love.

Arnold also benefitted from his association with excellent musicians. The distinctive steel guitar of the late Roy Wiggins highlighted early recordings. Charles Grean, once employed by the Glenn Miller Orchestra, played bass and wrote early arrangements, adding violins for the first time in 1956. Chet Atkins played on many of Arnold's records, even after he started serving as producer. Bassist, Bob Moore, the most recorded musician in history, first performed on the road with Eddy Arnold on the 1954 RCA Caravan and later performed on 75% of Arnold's hit recordings. Arnold also benefited from the management of Col. Parker, who guided his first career, and Jerry Purcell, who masterminded the second.

The most important factor for his success, however, was his voice. Steve Sholes, who produced all of his early hits, called Arnold a natural singer, comparing him to the likes of Bing Crosby and Enrico Caruso. Arnold worked hard perfecting his natural ability. A review of his musical career shows his progression from fledgling singer to polished performer.

Arnold's longevity is exceptional. For more than 50 years, he has transcended changing musical tastes. His recent concerts attract three generations of fans. To some he also serves as a role model; in a field often awash with alcohol and drugs, he has remained temperate.

Arnold has been honored with induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1966, been voted the first Country Music Association's Entertainer Of The Year the following year, and received the Academy of Country Music's Pioneer Award in 1985. Over his career, Arnold has sold over 85 million records and had 147 songs on the charts, including 28 Number 1 hits on Billboard's "Country Singles" chart. Among his recordings are songs for mothers and children, hymns, show tunes, and novelty numbers. Probably, however, Arnold is best known for his way with a love song.

In 2003, Arnold ranked #22 in CMT's 40 Greatest Men of Country Music.

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Richard Widmark - A movie Legend dies at 93


Richard Widmard Hollywood Legend Hollywood Dead Actor Hollywood Deaths
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Richard Widmark Died 93Richard Widmark (December 26, 1914 - March 24, 2008) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actor.

For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Widmark has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6800 Hollywood Boulevard. In 2002, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Death of Richard Widmark
Richard Widmark was 93 years old at the time of his death.
Richard's wife stated that he had a fractured a vertebra recently which worsened his condition. We don't know the exact cause of his death. But Richard Widmark had an illness for a long time.

What's my line?
Night and the City (1950) - trailer

Richard Widmard Hollywood Legend Hollywood Dead Actor Hollywood Deaths
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Widmark grew up in Princeton, Illinois, and attended Lake Forest College, where he studied acting. He taught acting at the college after graduation, before debuting on radio in 1938 in Aunt Jenny's Real Life Stories. He appeared on Broadway in 1943 in Kiss and Tell. He was unable to join the military during World War II because of a perforated eardrum.

Widmark's first movie appearance was in 1947's Kiss of Death, as the giggling, sociopathic villain Tommy Udo. His most notorious scene in the film found Udo pushing a wheelchair-bound old woman (played by Mildred Dunnock) down a flight of stairs to her death. Kiss of Death was a commercial and critical success, and started Widmark's seven-year contract with 20th Century Fox. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and won the Golden Globe Award for New Star Of The Year - Actor for his performance. Widmark's character was also the inspiration for the song, "The Ballad of Tommy Udo", by the band Kaleidoscope.

In 1950, Widmark co-starred with Paul Douglas, Barbara Bel Geddes, Jack Palance and Zero Mostel in Elia Kazan's Panic in the Streets, and with Gene Tierney in Jules Dassin's Night and the City, which are considered classic examples of film noir. Two years later, in 1952, Widmark had his handprints cast in cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre. During his stint at Fox, he appeared in The Street with No Name and Don't Bother to Knock with Marilyn Monroe among other projects. His later filmography includes Vincente Minnelli's 1955 cult film The Cobweb with Lauren Bacall.

Personal Life
Widmark was married to his first wife, Jean Hazlewood, a writer, for almost 55 years, from April 5, 1942 until her death on March 2, 1997. Their daughter, Anne Heath Widmark, an artist and author, married baseball legend Sandy Koufax on January 1, 1969 (but divorced in 1982). In September 1999, Widmark married Susan Blanchard, who earlier was Henry Fonda's third wife. From the 1950s until his death on March 24, 2008, Widmark resided in Roxbury, Connecticut.


Kiss of Death (1947)
The Street with No Name (1948)
Road House (1948)
Yellow Sky (1948)
Down to the Sea in Ships (1949)
Slattery's Hurricane (1949)
Night and the City (1950)
Panic in the Streets (1950)
No Way Out (1950)
Halls of Montezuma (1950)
The Frogmen (1951)
Red Skies of Montana (1952)
Don't Bother to Knock (1952)
O. Henry's Full House (1952)
My Pal Gus (1952)
Destination Gobi (1953)
Pickup on South Street (1953)
Take the High Ground! (1953)
Hell and High Water (1954)
Garden of Evil (1954)
Broken Lance (1954)
A Prize of Gold (1955)
The Cobweb (1955)
Backlash (1956)
Run for the Sun (1956)
The Last Wagon (1956)
Saint Joan (1957)
Time Limit (1957)
The Law and Jake Wade (1958)
The Tunnel of Love (1958)
The Trap (1959)
 Warlock (1959)
The Alamo (1960)
The Secret Ways (1961)
Two Rode Together (1961)
Judgment at Nuremberg (1961)
How the West Was Won (1962)
The Long Ships (1964)
Flight from Ashiya (1964)
Cheyenne Autumn (1964)
The Bedford Incident (1965)
Alvarez Kelly (1966)
The Way West (1967)
Madigan (1968)
A Talent for Loving (1969)
Death of a Gunfighter (1969)
The Moonshine War (1970)
Murder on the Orient Express (1974)
To the Devil a Daughter (1976)
The Sell-Out (1976)
Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977)
The Domino Principle (1977)
Rollercoaster (1977)
Coma (1978)
The Swarm (1978)
Bear Island (1979)
National Lampoon Goes to the Movies (1982)
Hanky Panky (1982)
Who Dares Wins (1982)
Against All Odds (1984)
True Colors (1991)
Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick (1996) (documentary) 


Dick Wilson - Mr. Whipple, Charmin tissue commercial

Dick WilsonDick Wilson (born Riccardo DiGuglielmo; July 30, 1916 – November 19, 2007), was a British-born American character actor who played the role of finicky grocery store manager Mr. (George) Whipple in over 500 Charmin toilet paper television commercials (1965–1989, 1999). In appreciation for his performance of the recognizable character, Procter & Gamble famously provided Wilson with a free lifetime supply of Charmin

Wilson died at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, United States. Cause of death was not specified.  Dick Wilson was 91 years old at the time of his death.  Wilson was survived by his wife Meg, daughters Wendy and actress Melanie Wilson of the ABC sitcom Perfect Strangers, and five grandchildren. He was Buried at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles.

Charmin Commercial - Dick Wilson as Mr. Whipple

Fabulous Moolah, Pro wrestler

WWE Female wrestler Toy Book Fabulous Moolah
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Dead WWE female restlerLilian Ellison (July 22, 1923 – November 2, 2007) better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah, was a female professional wrestler who was marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. She was well known as being the first NWA and WWF Women's Champion.

Fabulous Moolah's Death

Fabulous Moolah died iin Columbia South Carolina.
Fabulous Moolah was 84 years old at the time of her death.


Championships and accomplishments

  • National Wrestling Alliance
    NWA Women's Championship (5 times) (First)
  • World Wrestling Federation
    WWF Women's Championship (4 times) (First)
  • WWF Hall of Fame (Class of 1995)


Joey Bishop

Joey Bishop DVD
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Joey Bishop memoryJoey Bishop (February 3, 1918 – October 17, 2007) was an American entertainer, perhaps best remembered as being a member of the "Rat Pack" with Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. He was the last survivor of that group of entertainers.

In 1941, Bishop married Sylvia Ruzga, who died in 1999. They had one son, Larry Bishop.

Bishop appeared on television as early as 1948 and was a frequent guest on television talk shows, game shows, and comedy shows. He is listed as #96 on Comedy Central's list of the 100 greatest standups of all time.

Bishop was the last living member of The Rat Pack and was also the longest-lived member.

Cause of Death
Publicist and longtime friend, Warren Cowan, announced Bishop died of multiple causes at his home in Newport Beach, CA on October 17, 2007.  Joey Bishop was 89 years old at the time of his death.

Max Roach, Jazz Drummer

Max Roach CD Audio
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Max Roach Famous DrummerMaxwell Lemuel "Max" Roach (January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was a bebop/hard bop percussionist, drummer, and composer. He worked with many of the greatest jazz musicians, including Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins and Clifford Brown. Roach also led his own groups, and made numerous musical statements relating to the civil rights movement of African-Americans. He is generally considered to be one of the most important drummers in history. Member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Max Roach was 83 years old at the time of his death.  Cause of death was not known. but he had suffered for years from a neurological disorder.


Charles Lane, Actor

Charles Lane RememberCharles Lane (born as Charles Gerstle Levison January 26, 1905 – July 9, 2007) was an American character actor seen in many movies and TV shows, and at the time of his death was the oldest living American actor. Lane appeared in many Frank Capra films, including Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Arsenic and Old Lace, and It's a Wonderful Life.

Cause of death: unknown (he was 102 years old at his death)



Charles Lane 100 yr celebration, TV clips review

Kerwin Mathews, Actor

Kerwin Matews Dvd Sinbad
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Kerwiin Matews rememberKerwin Mathews (January 8, 1926 – July 5, 2007) was an American actor. He is best known for playing Sinbad in the 1958 Ray Harryhausen stop-motion animation feature The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, where he engaged in a sword fight with animated skeletons.

He died in his sleep in San Francisco on July 5, 2007 at the age of 81.

Mathews was born in Seattle, Washington, USA. He attended Janesville High School in Janesville, Wisconsin, where he had moved with his mother after his parents divorced. Mathews said that "a kind high school teacher put me in a play, and that changed my life." According to a classmate, he was a "handsome rascal" even then.After serving in the Army Air Forces, he attended and performed at nearby Milton College for two years before transferring to Beloit College on drama and music scholarships. Before acting, he was briefly a high school teacher in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin

After moving to Los Angeles in 1954, Mathews acted at the Pasadena Playhouse, where he met the head of casting for Columbia Pictures, leading to a seven-year studio contract.

Mathews was best known for his roles in fantasy movies in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly Jack the Giant Killer and The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad. He also notably played Lemuel Gulliver in Harryhausen's 1960 The 3 Worlds of Gulliver. He retired from acting in 1978.

Although he felt typecast, he "looked fondly" on his Hollywood career, with his favorite role Johann Strauss II in the Disney two-part telefilm The Waltz King.

After retirement, he moved to San Francisco, where he ran a clothing and antiques shop. He died in his sleep in San Francisco on July 5, 2007 at the age of 81. He leaves behind his partner of 46 years, Tom Nicoll.


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