90

Claiborne Pell - US Senetor created Pell Grant dies 90

Claiborne Pell Grant diesClaiborne Pell (November 22, 1918 – January 1, 2009) was a former United States Senator from Rhode Island, serving six terms from 1961 to 1997, and was best known as the sponsor of the Pell Grant, which provides financial aid funding to U.S. college students. A Democrat, he was that state's longest serving senator.

Death of Claiborne Pell
Claiborne Pell suffered from Parkinson's Disease. Pell died on January 1, 2009. He was 90 years old

Pell attended St. George's School in Newport, Rhode Island, then received a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Princeton University in 1940, and a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University in 1946. While in Princeton, he was a member of Colonial Club.

Pell was married to the former Nuala O'Donnell, a descendant of the Hartford family and, as such, one of the heirs to the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company fortune

All My Children's Eileen Herlie Dies 90

Eileen Herlie (born Eileen Herlihy; March 8, 1918 – October 8, 2008) was a Scottish-American actress.

Until the late 1990s, Herlie was one of the few actresses to ever portray the same character on three different soaps. In 1993, she portrayed Myrtle on the All My Children sister-soap Loving. In December 2000, she portrayed Myrtle in crossover appearances on the soap opera One Life to Live, where a 'Who's the Daddy?' storyline was playing out on all four ABC soaps (All My Children, One Life to Live, General Hospital, and the now canceled Port Charles).

Death of Eileen Herlie
On October 8, 2008, Eileen passed away due to complications from pneumonia. She was 90 years old.

All My Children - Aileen Herlie

Eileen Herlie's biography continues next page

Eileen Herlie was born to a Catholic father and a Protestant mother in Glasgow, Scotland. Herlie was trained as a theatre actress, but her first big film break was being cast by Laurence Olivier in his 1948 film adaptation of William Shakespeare's Hamlet. She portrayed Hamlet's mother, Gertrude, despite the fact that she was 11 years younger than Olivier, who portrayed her son, Hamlet. She reprised her Gertrude in the 1964 Broadway production starring Richard Burton. She repeated her Gertrude in the 1964 film version of the Broadway stage production.

After Olivier's Hamlet Herlie continued to make sporadic film appearances, but remained primarily in the theatre. In 1955 she was Irene Molloy in The Matchmaker on Broadway (this play was later made into Hello Dolly!). In 1960, she was nominated for a Tony Award as 'Best Actress in a Musical' for Take Me Along, in which she played opposite Jackie Gleason.

In 1976, Herlie made the move to television soap operas in the role of Myrtle Fargate on All My Children. In the 1980s, Herlie was nominated for three consecutive Daytime Emmy Awards (1984, 1985 and 1986). She became close friends with fellow cast member Louis Edmonds, and spoke at his funeral in 2001.

Grammy-Winning Singer Jo Stafford Dies at 90

Hollywood Walk of Famer Hollywood Walk of Famer Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Joe StaffordJo Stafford (November 12, 1917 – July 16, 2008), born Jo Elizabeth Stafford, in Coalinga, California, was an American pop singer whose career spanned the late 1930s through the early 1960s. Stafford is greatly admired for the purity of her voice and was considered one of the most versatile vocalists of the era. She was also viewed as a pioneer of modern musical parody, having won a Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album in 1961 (with husband Paul Weston) for their album Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris.

Death of Jo Stafford
Jo Stafford is died of congestive heart failure.
Jo Stafford was 90 years old at the time of her death

I'll be seeting You

You Belong To me

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Albums
Kiss Me, Kate (1949)
Jo Stafford with Gordon MacRae (1949)
Autumn in New York (1950)
Songs for Sunday Evening (1950)
American Folk Songs (1950)
Songs of Faith (1950)
Jo Stafford: Capitol Collectors Series (1950)
As You Desire Me (1952)
Starring Jo Stafford (1953)
Broadway's Best (1953)
New Orleans (1954)
Garden of Prayers (1954)
My Heart's in the Highland (1954)
Soft and Sentimental (1955)
Songs of Scotland (1955)
Memory Songs (1955)
Happy Holiday (1955)
Ski Trails (1956)
A Girl Named Jo (1956)
Once Over Lightly (1957)
Swinging Down Broadway (1958)
Ballad of the Blues (1959)
I'll Be Seeing You (1959)
Jo Stafford's Greatest Hits (1959)
Jo + Jazz (1960)
Music of My Life (1961)
Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris (1961)
Whispering Hope (1962)
The Hits of Jo Stafford (1963)
Peace in the Valley (1963)
Joyful Season (1964)
Getting Sentimental over Tommy Dorsey (1964)
Sweet Hour of Prayer (1964)
This is Jo Stafford (1966)
Do I Hear a Waltz? (1966)
Big Band Sound (1970)
Piano Artistry of Jonathan Edwards (1985)
G.I. Joe (1987)
Broadway Revisited (1987)
You Belong to Me (1989)
America;s Most Versatile Singing Star (1990)
Fabulous Song Stylists (1991)
You'll Never Walk Alone (1992)
Greatest Hits (1993)
Sixteen Most Requested Songs (1995)
The Very Best of Jo Stafford (1995)
Say It's Wonderful (1995)
For You (1995)
Spotlight on Jo Stafford (1996)
Jazz (1996)
Drifting and Dreaming with Jo Stafford (1996)
Jo Stafford Story (1997)
The One and Only (1997)
Walkin' My Baby Back Home (1998)
G.I. Jo Sings the Hits (1998)
Too Marvellous for Words (1998)
Coming Back Like a Song: 25 Hits: 1941-47 (1998)
No Other Love (1998)
Jo Stafford (1940-44 (1998)
Happy Holidays: I Love the Winter Weather (1999)
Jo + Broadway (1999)
Jo + Blues (1999)
Songs of Faith, Hope and Love (1999)
Just Reminicin' (2000)
Jo and Friends (2000)
The Columbia Hits Collection (2001)
Candy (2001)
Haunted Heart (2001)
A–You're Adorable (2001)
International Hits (2001)
Cocktail Hour (2001)
The Magic of Jo Stafford (2001)
My Darling, My Darling (2001)
Jo Stafford on Capital (2001)
Best of the War Years (2001)
The Old Rugged Cross (2001)
The Two of Us (2001)
I Remember You (2002)
The Ultimate Jo Stafford (2002)
The Best of Jo Stafford (2003)
Meet Jo Stafford (2003)
You Belong to Me (2003)
Stars of the Summer Night (2004)
Over the Rainbow (2004)
Alone and Together (2005)
Memories Are Made of These (2005)
Love, Mystery and Adventure (2006)
Sincerely Yours (2006)
This is Gold (2006)
Vintage Years (2006)
All Hits (2006)
Ultimate Capitol Collection (2007)
Jo Stafford and Friends (2007)
Her Greatest Hits (2008)

Notable songs

Solo
"All The Things You Are"
"Allentown Jail"
"Autumn in New York"
"Black Is the Color"
"Day By Day"
"Early Autumn"
"Feudin' and Fightin'"
"Goodnight Irene" 
"Haunted Heart"
"Here I'll Stay"
"I Love You"
"Indiscretion"
"I'll Be Seeing You"
"It Could Happen to You"
"It's Almost Tomorrow"
"Ivy"
"Jambalaya"
 "Keep It a Secret"
"Just One Way to Say I Love You"
"The Last Mile Home"
"Let's Take the Long Way Home"
"Long Ago (And Far Away)"
"Make Love to Me!"
"The Nearness of You"
"No Other Love" 
"On London Bridge"
"Out Of This World"
"Ragtime Cowboy Joe"
"September Song"
"Serenade of the Bells"
"Shrimp Boats"
"Some Enchanted Evening"
"Suddenly There's a Valley"
 "Swingin' On Nothin'"
"Symphony"
"Teach Me Tonight" 
"Thank You for Calling"
"That Sugar Baby O' Mine"
"That's for Me"
"(Now and Then) There's a Fool Such As I"
"There's No You"
"The Things We Did Last Summer"
"White Christmas" 
"Wind in the Willow"
"With a Little Bit of Luck"
"You Belong to Me"

With Frankie Laine
"Back Where I Belong"
"Basin Street Blues"
"Floatin' Down To Cotton Town"
"Goin' Like Wildfire"
"Hey Good Lookin'"
"In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening"
"Pretty-Eyed Baby"
"Settin' The Woods On Fire"
"Way Down Yonder In New Orleans"

With Gordon MacRae
"'A' — You're Adorable"
"Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo (The Magic Song)" 
"Dearie"
"Echoes"
"My Darling, My Darling"
"Say Something Sweet To Your Sweetheart"
"Whispering Hope"

With Johnny Mercer
"Candy"
"It's Great to Be Alive"

Jo Stafford Biography 

Early years
Stafford was born to Grover Cleveland Stafford and Anna York Stafford, a distant cousin of Sergeant Alvin York. Originally, she wanted to become an opera singer and studied voice as a child. However, because of the economic Great Depression, she abandoned that idea and joined her sisters Christine and Pauline in a popular vocal group, "The Stafford Sisters," which performed on Los Angeles radio station KHJ.

The Pied Pipers
When her sisters married, the group broke up and Stafford joined a new vocal group, The Pied Pipers. This group consisted of eight members: John Huddleston (who was Stafford's husband at the time), Hal Hooper, Chuck Lowry, Bud Hervey, George Tait, Woody Newbury, and Dick Whittinghill, besides Stafford. The group became very popular, working on local radio and movie soundtracks, and caught the attention of two of Tommy Dorsey's arrangers, Axel Stordahl and Paul Weston.

In 1938, Weston persuaded Dorsey to sign The Pied Pipers for his radio show, and they went to New York for a broadcast date. Dorsey liked them enough to sign them for ten weeks, but after the second broadcast the sponsor heard them and disliked them, firing the group. They stayed in New York for three months, but landed only a single job that paid them just $3.60 each, though they did record four sides for RCA Victor Records.

Half the members of the Pied Pipers returned to Los Angeles, but they had a difficult time trying to make a living until they got an offer from Dorsey to join his big band in 1939. This led to success for the whole group, but especially for Stafford, who was also featured in solo performances. The group also backed Frank Sinatra in some of his early recordings.

In 1942, the group had an argument with Dorsey and left, but in 1943 it became one of the first groups signed to Johnny Mercer's new label, Capitol Records. Capitol's music director was the same Paul Weston who had been instrumental in introducing Stafford to Dorsey. Weston and Stafford married in 1952. They went on to have two children, Tim and Amy.

Solo career
In 1944, Stafford left the Pied Pipers to go solo. Her tenure with the USO, in which she gave countless performances for soldiers stationed overseas, acquired her the nickname "GI Jo."

Beginning in 1944, she hosted the Tuesday and Thursday broadcasts of an NBC musical variety radio program — the Chesterfield Supper Club.

In 1948 Stafford and Gordon MacRae had a million-seller with their version of "Say Something Sweet to Your Sweetheart" and in 1949 repeated their success with "My Happiness".

In 1950, she left Capitol for Columbia Records, then returning to Capitol in 1961. At Columbia, she was the first recording artist to sell twenty-five million records. During her second stint at Capitol, Stafford also recorded for Frank Sinatra's Reprise label. These albums were released between 1961 and 1964, and were mostly retrospective in nature. Stafford left the label when Sinatra sold it to Warner Bros.

In the 1950s, she had a string of popular hits with Frankie Laine, six of which charted; their duet of Hank Williams' "Hey Good Lookin'" making the top ten in 1951. It was also at this time that Stafford scored her best known hits with huge records like "Jambalaya," "Shrimp Boats," "Make Love to Me," and "You Belong to Me". The last song was Stafford's all-time biggest hit, topping the charts in both the United States and the United Kingdom (the first song by a female singer to top the UK chart).

Comedy career
Stafford briefly experimented with comedy under the name "Cinderella G. Stump" with Red Ingle and the Natural Seven. True success in the comedy genre, though, would come about almost accidentally.

Throughout the 1950s, Stafford and Paul Weston would entertain guests at parties by putting on a skit in which they assumed the identities Jonathan and Darlene Edwards, a bad lounge act. Stafford, as Darlene, would sing off-key in a high pitched voice; Weston, as Jonathan, played an untuned piano off key and with bizarre rhythms.

Finding that she had time left over following a 1957 recording session, Stafford, as a gag, recorded a track as Darlene Edwards. Those who heard bootlegs of the recording responded positively, and later that year, Stafford and Weston recorded an entire album of songs as Jonathan and Darlene, entitled Jo Stafford and Paul Weston Present: The Original Piano Artistry of Jonathan Edwards, Vocals by Darlene Edwards. As a publicity stunt, Stafford and Weston claimed that the Edwardses were a New Jersey lounge act that they had discovered, and denied any personal connection; much time would pass before people realized (and Stafford and Weston admitted) that they were in fact the Edwardses. The album was followed up with a "pop standards" album, on which the pair intentionally butchered popular music. The album was a commercial and critical success; it proved to be the first commercially successful musical parody album, laying the groundwork for the careers of later "full time" musical parodists such as Weird Al Yankovic.

The couple continued releasing Jonathan and Darlene albums, with their 1961 album, Jonathan and Darlene Edwards in Paris winning that year's Grammy Award for Best Comedy Album (they "tied" with Bob Hope, as the Grammys decided, in a rare move, to issue two comedy awards that year. Hope was given an award for "Spoken Word Comedy.") It was the only major award that Stafford ever won.

The couple continued to release Jonathan and Darlene albums for several years, and in 1977 released a final, one-off single, a cover of The Bee Gees' "Stayin' Alive" backed with "I Am Woman." The same year also saw a brief resurgence in the popularity of Jonathan and Darlene albums when their cover of "Carioca" was featured as the opening and closing theme to The Kentucky Fried Movie.

Retirement
In 1966, Stafford went into semi-retirement, retiring completely from the music business in 1975. Except for the 1977 Jonathan and Darlene Edwards version of "Stayin' Alive," Stafford wouldn't perform again until 1990, at a ceremony honoring Frank Sinatra.

Stafford won a breach-of-contract lawsuit against her former record label in the early 1990s, which won her the rights to all of her old recordings, including the Jonathan and Darlene recordings. Following the lawsuit, Stafford, along with son Tim, reactivated the Corinthian Record label which began life as a religious label the deeply religious Paul Weston had started. With Paul Weston's help, she compiled a pair of Best of Jonathan and Darlene albums, which were released in 1993. In 1996, Paul Weston died of natural causes. Stafford continued to operate Corinthian Records. In 2006, she donated her library and her husband's to the University of Arizona.

Arthur C. Clarke - science fiction writer, 2001: A Space Odyssey

Arthur C ClarkeSir Arthur Charles Clarke (December 16, 1917 – March 19, 2008) was a British science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name.

In December 2007, the occasion of his 90th birthday, Clarke recorded a video message to his friends and fans, bidding them good-bye.

Clarke died in Sri Lanka at 1:30am on March 19, 2008 local time, after suffering from breathing problems, according to Rohan de Silva, one of his aides

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Dabbs Greer, actor

dabbs greerRobert William "Dabbs" Greer (April 2, 1917 — April 28, 2007) was an American character actor who performed many diverse supporting roles in film and television for about 50 years.

Greer was born in Fairview, Missouri and attended Drury University, where he was a member of Theta Kappa Nu. His Southern voice fitted well in shows featuring rustic characters, such as Westerns.
 
Dabbs Greer in 1999He was recognizable to fans of The Adventures of Superman, as he appeared in three separate episodes on that show, including the series' inaugural entry, Superman on Earth (1952). He was the major guest star, as a man framed for capital murder in Five Minutes to Doom (1954 - see photo on right), and as an eccentric millionaire in The Superman Silver Mine (1958).

Greer had a prominent continuing role in the NBC TV series Little House on the Prairie as Reverend Alden from 1974 to 1983. Often cast as a minister, he performed the marriages of Rob and Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show and of Mike and Carol Brady on The Brady Bunch, and he tended to the spiritual needs of the townfolk in fictional Rome, Wisconsin, as Reverend Henry Novotny in Picket Fences.

In the 1958 film I Want to Live! he played the San Quentin captain who finished strapping down Barbara Graham in the gas chamber prior to her execution and was the last person to speak to her. He had a similar role in the 1999 film The Green Mile, in which he played the elderly version of Tom Hanks' Death Row officer Paul Edgecomb.

In the May 9, 1991, episode of L.A. Law called "On the Toad Again", he played a character who was addicted to a "high" produced by licking the skin secretions of psychoactive toads.

Death

Greer, a Missouri native, died April 28, 2007 at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena California after a battle with kidney and heart disease.  He was 90 years old

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Glenn Ford - MEGA star, The original 3:10 to Yuma

Hollywood Walk of FamerGolden Globe Winner 

Glnn Ford DeathGwyllyn Samuel Newton "Glenn" Ford (May 1, 1916 – August 30, 2006) was an acclaimed Canadian-born actor from Hollywood's Golden Era with a career that spanned seven decades. Ford was a versatile actor best known for playing either cowboys or ordinary men in unusual circumstances.

Death of Glenn Ford
Flenn Ford suffered a series of minor strokes which left him in frail health in the years leading up to his death.
Glenn Ford was 90 years old at the time of his death

Early life and career
He was born to Anglo-Quebecer parents at Jeffrey Hale Hospital in Quebec City, Quebec and was a great-nephew of Canada's first Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald. Ford moved to Santa Monica, California with his family at the age of eight, and became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1939.

Glenn Ford - Scene from "Gilda"

Jean Parker - Actress (30's - 60's) Beth from Little Women

Jean Parker (August 11, 1915 – November 30, 2005) was an American movie actress.

Born as Lois Mae Green in Deer Lodge, Montana, she appeared in 70 movies from 1932 through 1966. She was discovered by Ida Koverman, secretary to MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer, after she saw a poster featuring Parker portraying Father Time. She attended Pasadena schools and graduated from John Muir High School. Her original aspirations were in the fine arts and illustration.

Death of Jean Parker
Jean Parker spent her final years in the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, where she died of a stroke on November 30, 2005.
Jean parker was 90 years old at the time of his death.

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  • Jean Parker's biography continues on next page

Jean Parker in She Married A Cop (1939)

Jean Parker biography continues 

She had a successful career at MGM, RKO and Columbia including important roles such as the tragic Beth in the original Little Women, among many other film appearances including Frank Capra's Lady for A Day and Gabriel Over the White House; Sequoia; The Ghost Goes West, opposite Robert Donat; and Rasputin and the Empress, with fellow players, the Barrymore siblings (John, Ethel, and Lionel) in the only movie they all made together. In 1939, she starred opposite Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in RKO's The Flying Deuces.

Parker stayed active in film throughout the 1940s, playing opposite Lon Chaney in "Dead Man's Eyes" "Detective Kitty O' Day", and a variety of other films. Parker managed her own airport and flying service with then-husband Doug Dawson in Palm Springs, California until shortly after the start of World War II. During World War II, she toured many of the veteran hospitals throughout the U.S. and performed on radio. In the 1950s, Parker co-starred opposite Edward G. Robinson in Black Tuesday; had a small but effective role in Gunfighter which starred Gregory Peck and appeared with Randolph Scott and Angela Lansbury in the western Lawless Street (1955). Her last film appearance was Apache Uprising (1966), directed by A. C. Lyles.

Parker also appeared on Broadway. In 1949 she replaced Judy Holliday in Born Yesterday on Broadway and enjoyed a successful run in this classic. Parker also appeared on Broadway opposite Bert Lahr in the play Burlesque, did summer stock in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, was on tour in the play Candlelight and Loco, and performed on stage in other professional productions.

She married Robert Lowery (who played Batman in 1949) in 1950. Two years later she gave birth to a son, Robert Lowery Hanks, an executive with the city of Los Angeles, California. Later in life, she continued a successful stint on the West Coast theatre circuit and worked as an acting coach.

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Douglas Fairbanks, Jr - Actor, Gunga Din, (2 stars at walk of fame)

Douglas Fairbanks MovieDouglas Fairbanks 40s actor
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Douglas Fairbanks Jr

Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr., KBE, DSC, K.st.j. (December 9, 1909 – May 7, 2000) was an American actor and a highly decorated naval officer of World War II.

Birth of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. was born in New York City, the son of actor Douglas Fairbanks and his first wife, Anna Beth Sully. His parents divorced when he was ten years old. He lived with his mother in California, Paris, and London.

Death of Douglas Fairbanks, Jr
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. died of a heart attack in New York.
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. was 90 years old at the time of his death. He is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California, in the same crypt as his father.

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Hollywood
Largely on the basis of his name, he was given a contract at age fourteen with Paramount Pictures. After making some undistinguished films, he took to the stage, where he impressed his father, his stepmother Mary Pickford, and Charlie Chaplin, who encouraged him to continue with acting.

He began his career during the silent era. He was exceptionally handsome and initially played mainly supporting roles in a range of films featuring many of the leading female players of the day, Belle Bennett in Stella Dallas (1925), Esther Ralston in An American Venus (1926)and Pauline Starke in Women Love Diamonds (1927). In the last years of the silent period he was upped to star billing opposite Loretta Young in several pre-Code films, and Joan Crawford in Our Modern Maidens (1929). He supported John Gilbert and Greta Garbo in Woman of Affairs (1929). Progressing to sound, he played opposite Katharine Hepburn in her Oscar-winning role in the film Morning Glory (1933).

With Outward Bound (1930), The Dawn Patrol (1930), Little Caesar (1931), and Gunga Din (1939), his movies began to have more commercial success.

Marriages
His first notable relationship was with the actress Joan Crawford, whom he began to seriously date during the filming of their film Our Modern Maidens. On June 3, 1929, at City Hall in New York City, Crawford and Fairbanks married. He was technically underage, so one year was added to his birth (giving him 1908 as his year of birth), and Crawford shed three years from her age, which would remain shed until long after her death, giving her the same year of birth that Fairbanks had created for himself, 1908.

They went on a delayed honeymoon to England, where he was entertained by Noel Coward and George, Duke of Kent. He became active in both society and politics, but Crawford was far more interested in her career and her new affair with Clark Gable. The couple divorced in 1933.

Despite their divorce, Fairbanks and Crawford maintained a good relationship. In his later years, Fairbanks was quick to defend Crawford when her adopted daughter Christina Crawford, published Mommie Dearest, a scathing biography of Crawford's personal life. He firmly stated, "The Joan Crawford that I've heard about in Mommie Dearest is not the Joan Crawford I knew back when."

On April 22, 1939, he married Mary Lee Hartford (née Mary Lee Epling), a former wife of George Huntington Hartford, the Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company heir. Douglas and Mary Lee were happily married for nearly fifty years, until Mary Lee died in 1988. They had three daughters, Daphne (married David Weston), Victoria (married Barend Van Gerbig) and Melissa (married Richard Morant). Douglas and Mary Lee had eight grandchildren:Anthony, Nicholas, Dominic and Natasha Weston; Barend and Eliza Isabella O Van Gerbig and Joseph and Crystal Morant. Their great grandchildren are:Benji, Hugo and Alfie Weston; Georgina and Eliza Weston; Aislinn and Charlie Weston; Violette Stymmel-Morant.

World War II
In 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed him a special envoy to South America.

Although celebrated as an actor, Fairbanks most enduring legacy was a well-kept secret for decades. At the onset of World War II, Fairbanks was commissioned a reserve officer in the United States Navy and assigned to Lord Mountbatten's Commando staff in England.

Having witnessed (and participated in) British training and cross-channel harassment operations emphasizing the military art of deception, Fairbanks attained a depth of understanding and appreciation of military deception then unheard of in the United States Navy. Lieutenant Fairbanks was subsequently transferred to Virginia Beach where he came under the command of Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, who was preparing U.S. Naval forces for the invasion of North Africa.

Fairbanks was able to convince Hewitt of the advantages of such a unit, and Admiral Hewitt soon took Fairbanks to Washington, D.C. to sell the idea to the Chief of Naval Operations, ADM Ernest King. Fairbanks succeeded and ADM King issued a secret letter on 5 March 1943 charging the Vice Chief of Naval Operations with the recruitment of 180 officers and 300 enlisted men for the Beach Jumper program.

The Beach Jumpers mission would simulate amphibious landings with a very limited force. Operating dozens of kilometers from the actual landing beaches and utilizing their deception equipment, the Beach Jumpers would lure the enemy into believing that theirs was the location of the amphibious beach landing, when in fact the actual amphibious landing would be conducted at another location. Even if the enemy was less than 100-percent convinced of the deception, the uncertainty created by the operations could conceivably delay enemy reinforcement of the actual landing area by several crucial hours.

United States Navy Beach Jumpers saw their initial action in Operation Husky, the invasion of Sicily. Throughout the remainder of the war, the Beach Jumpers conducted their hazardous, shallow-water operations throughout the Mediterranean.

For his planning the diversion-deception operations and his part in the amphibious assault on Southern France, Lieutenant Commander Fairbanks was awarded the United States Navy's Legion of Merit with bronze V (for valor), the Italian War Cross for Military Valor, the French Legion d'Honneur and the Croix de Guerre with Palm, and the British Distinguished Service Cross. Fairbanks was also awarded the Silver Star for valor displayed while serving on PT boats.

He was made an Honorary Knight Commander of the British Empire (KBE) in 1949.

It is not a stretch to say that Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. was the father of the United States Navy's Information Operations. As for the Beach Jumpers, they changed names several times in the decades following World War II, expanded their focus, and are currently known as the Navy Information Operations Command. Fairbanks stayed in the Naval Reserve after the war and ultimately retired a captain in 1954.

Many of the Navy's most important information operations since World War II remain classified, but it is clear that the U.S. military retains its interest in this art of war.

Post-war years
Fairbanks returned to Hollywood at the conclusion of World War II and enjoyed success as host of the Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Theater in the early years of television.

Fairbanks was a confirmed Anglophile and spent a good deal of his time in Britain, where he was well known in the highest social circles. Between 1954 and 1956 he also made a number of half-hour movies for television at one of the smaller Elstree film studios. The College of Arms in London granted Fairbanks a coat of arms symbolising the U.S. and Britain united across the blue Atlantic Ocean by a silken knot of friendship.

It has been claimed that Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. was one of the naked men in the incriminating photos which were used as evidence in the divorce trial of Margaret Campbell, Duchess of Argyll in 1963.

He was good friends with legendary English stage and screen actor Sir Laurence Olivier, and was one of the contributors to a documentary of Olivier's life The South Bank Show Laurence Olivier: A Life.

He was the celebrated godfather of actor, John Bouvier Slatton, a relationship that he was proud of and cherished in his later years. Upon Slatton's death in an airplane accident, several months before his own death, Fairbanks was distraught with grief.

He died of a heart attack in New York at the age of 90. He is interred in the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood, California, in the same crypt as his father.

Legacy
Fairbanks has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, one for motion pictures at 6318 Hollywood Boulevard and one for television at 6665 Hollywood Boulevard.

Partial filmography
American Aristocracy (1916)
The Three Musketeers (1921)
Stephen Steps Out (1923)
The Air Mail (1925)
Wild Horse Mesa (1925)
Stella Dallas (1925)
The American Venus (1926)
Padlocked (1926)
Broken Hearts of Hollywood (1926)
Man Bait (1927)
Women Love Diamonds (1927)
Is Zat So? (1927)
A Texas Steer (1927)
Dead Man's Curve (1928)
Modern Mothers (1928)
The Toilers (1928)
The Power of the Press (1928)
The Barker (1928)
A Woman of Affairs (1928)
 Hollywood Snapshots #11 (1929) (short subject)
The Forward Pass (1929)
The Jazz Age (1929)
Our Modern Maidens (1929)
Little Caesar (1931)
Catherine the Great (1934)
Man of the Moment (1935)
The Amateur Gentleman (1936)
The Prisoner of Zenda (1937)
Joy of Living (1938)
The Rage of Paris (1938)
Having Wonderful Time (1938)
Gunga Din (1939)
Green Hell (1940)
Angels Over Broadway (1940)
The Corsican Brothers (1941)
Sinbad the Sailor (1947)
The Exile (1947)
Ghost Story (1981)

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Claire Trevor - Oscar winning actress, Stagecoach, Key Largo

Claire Trevor MovieHollywood Deaths
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Clair TrevorClaire Trevor (March 8, 1910 - April 8, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. Beautiful and talented, she was nicknamed the "Queen of Film Noir" because of her many appearances in "bad girl” roles in film noir and other black-and-white thrillers. She appeared in over 60 films.

Death of Claire Trevor
Claire Trevor died of respiratory failure in Newport Beach, April 8, 2000.
Claire Trevor was 90 years old at the time of her death.
Claire Trevor is survived by several stepchildren by her marriage to Bren. Claire Trevor was cremated and her remains were scattered at sea.

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
1948 for Key Largo

Early life
Trevor was born as Claire Wemlinger in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York, the only child of a 5th Avenue merchant-tailor and his wife. Her family was of Irish American and French American descent.

Stagecoach

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Claire Trevor MovieHollywood Deaths
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Early life
Trevor was born as Claire Wemlinger in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York, the only child of a 5th Avenue merchant-tailor and his wife. Her family was of Irish American and French American descent.

Career
Trevor's acting career spanned more than seven decades and included success in stage, radio, television and film. Trevor often played the hard-boiled blonde, and every conceivable type of "bad girl" role. After attending American Academy of Dramatic Arts, she began her acting career in the late '20s in stock. By 1932 she was starring on Broadway; that same year she began appearing in Brooklyn-filmed Vitaphone shorts. Her first credited film role was in the 1933 film Life in the Raw, with her feature film debut coming that same year in Jimmy and Sally (1933), with her portraying "Sally Johnson". From 1933 through 1938 Trevor starred in twenty nine films, often having either the lead role or the role of heroine. In 1937 she starred with Humphrey Bogart in Dead End, which would lead to her being nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

By 1939 she was well established as a solid "leading lady". Some of her most memorable performances during this period were opposite John Wayne, including the classic 1939 western Stagecoach, which was Wayne's breakthrough role. She also starred opposite Wayne in Allegheny Uprising that same year, and again in 1940 in Dark Command. Another two of her more memorable roles was when she starred in Murder, My Sweet opposite Dick Powell, and fellow film noir flick Born to Kill playing a divorcee who gets more than she bargained for by falling in love with a bad boy who impulsively murders.

Awards and nominations
Trevor seemed to have her best performances when starring with either John Wayne or Humphrey Bogart. Of the Academy Award nominations and wins that she earned, two were starring opposite Bogart, and one was opposite Wayne. Although she was not nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in Wayne's 1939 breakthrough film, Stagecoach, the film itself received Academy Award nominations in four categories, winning two of them.

Her awards and accolades include;

  • She was nominated for Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Dead End, a 1937 melodrama in which she played a good girl who grows up to be a prostitute, which co-starred Humphrey Bogart.
  • Trevor won the award for Best Supporting Actress for her 1948 performance in Key Largo, co-starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson and Lauren Bacall.
  • In 1956, Trevor won an Emmy for Best Live Television Performance by an Actress for Dodsworth, with Fredric March, on NBC's Producers' Showcase.
  • She was nominated again for an Academy Award for her performance in The High and the Mighty, a 1954 airplane disaster epic starring John Wayne.
  • The Claire Trevor School of the Arts at the University of California, Irvine was named in Trevor's honor. Both her Oscar and Emmy trophies are on display in the Arts Plaza there, next to the Claire Trevor Theatre.
  • She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Private life
Trevor married film producer Clark Andrews in 1938, but they divorced four years later. Her second marriage to Cylos William Dunsmoore produced a son, Charles. The marriage ended in divorce in 1947. The next year, Trevor married Milton Bren, another film producer and soon after moved to Newport Beach, California.

In 1978 her only biological child, her son Charles Dunsmoore, died in an airliner crash and her last husband, Milton Bren, died from a brain tumor in 1979. Trevor retired from acting in 1987. She made a special Academy Awards Appearance in 1998 at the 70th Academy Awards.

She died of respiratory failure in Newport Beach, April 8, 2000 at the age of 90, survived by several stepchildren by her marriage to Bren. Claire Trevor was cremated and her remains were scattered at sea.

Selected filmography
Dante's Inferno (1935)
15 Maiden Lane (1936)
Dead End (1937)
The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (1938)
Stagecoach (1939)
I Stole a Million (1939)
Allegheny Uprising (1939)
Dark Command (1940)
Honky Tonk (1941)
Crossroads (1942)
Street of Chance (1942)
Murder, My Sweet (1944)
 Johnny Angel (1945)
Crack-Up (1946)
Born to Kill (1947)
Raw Deal (1948)
The Velvet Touch (1948)
The Babe Ruth Story (1948)
Key Largo (1948)
Raw Deal (1948)
The High and the Mighty (1954)
The Mountain (1956)
Marjorie Morningstar (1958)
How to Murder Your Wife (1965)

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