87

William Campbell, Actor, ‘Star Trek’ Klingon, Dies 87

William Campbell (October 30, 1923 – April 28, 2011) was an American actor who appeared in supporting roles in major film productions and also starred in several low-budget B-movies, including two cult horror films.

Campbell has obtained cult status for his guest starring roles on Star Trek, appearing first as the mischievous super-being Trelane (in part a parody of Liberace, whom Campbell resembled), in an episode of the original series called "The Squire of Gothos". Campbell also appeared twice as the Klingon Captain Koloth. Campbell first played Koloth on the original Star Trek series in the classic episode "The Trouble With Tribbles." He reprised the Koloth role on the series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, some thirty years later. Campbell appeared at several Trek conventions in the 1980s and 1990s and many Star Trek fans consider Campbell's portrayal of the Trelane character as the first introduction of the "Q culture" to the series. (The Q are an omnipotent race made part of The Next Generation, then Deep Space 9 and Voyager series.) His last appearance was at the convention organized by Creation Entertainment at the Las Vegas Hilton in August 2006.

He died quietly on April 28, 2011, at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California.

 

Irvin Kershner, Director Of 'The Empire Strikes Back,' Dies 87

Irvin Kershner (April 29, 1923 – November 27, 2010) was an American film director and occasional actor, best known for directing Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, Never Say Never Again and RoboCop 2.

After Empire Strikes Back, Kershner directed Never Say Never Again (Sean Connery's return to the role of James Bond); the HBO film Travelling Man starring John Lithgow and Jonathan Silverman; for which Kershner was nominated for an ACE Award; and RoboCop 2. He also directed several episodes of the television series seaQuest DSV, and he made his debut as an actor in the Martin Scorsese film, The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), playing Zebedee, the father of the apostles James and John. He played a film director in Steven Seagal's On Deadly Ground.

Death of Irvin Kershner
Irvin Kershner died at his Los Angeles home after a long illness (unspecified).
Irvin Kershner was 87 years old at the time of his death.

Empire Stikes Back - trailer (unofficial, created by a fan)

Variety columnist Army Archerd has dies 87

Armand "Army" Archerd (January 13, 1922 – September 8, 2009) was a columnist for Variety for over fifty years before retiring his "Just for Variety" column in September 2005. In November 2005, Archerd began blogging for Variety and was working on a memoir when he died.

Life and career
Archerd was born in The Bronx, New York and graduated from UCLA in 1941. He was hired by Variety to replace columnist Sheilah Graham (former girlfriend of F. Scott Fitzgerald) in 1953. His "Just for Variety" column appeared on page two of Daily Variety and swiftly became popular in Hollywood. Archerd broke countless exclusive stories, reporting from film sets, announcing pending deals, giving news of star-related hospitalizations, marriages, and births. In 1984, he was given a star on the Hollywood's Walk of Fame, in front of Mann's Chinese Theater, where he had emceed dozens of movie premieres.

One of his most significant scoops was in his July 23, 1985, column, when he printed that Rock Hudson, despite denials from the actor's publicists and managers, was undergoing treatment for AIDS.

Archerd was Jewish and a strong proponent of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Holocaust awareness. He was married to Selma Archerd, a former actress; they lived in Westwood, California.

Death of Army Archerd
Archerd died at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center from of a rare form of mesothelioma, "thought to be the result of his exposure to asbestos in the Navy during WWII."

Gale Storm, singer, star of '50s hit TV series, dies 87

 

Josephine Owaissa Cottle (April 5, 1922 - June 27, 2009), better known as Gale Storm, is an American actress and singer, who starred in two popular television programs of the 1950s, My Little Margie and The Gale Storm Show.

Television & Music Career
Storm's television career skyrocketed from 1952 to 1955, with her starring role in My Little Margie. The show was originally a summer replacement for I Love Lucy. It ran for 126 episodes.

Storm's popularity was capitalized upon in The Gale Storm Show (aka Oh! Susanna).  This show ran for 143 episodes between 1956 and 1960. Both of her series were shown countless times in reruns.

Gale Storm had several top ten songs. She headlined in Las Vegas and appeared in numerous stage plays.

Death of Gale Storm
Storm lived alone in Monarch Beach, California, near her two sons and their families, until failing health in recent years forced her into a convalescent home in Danville, California.  Cause of death is not known.
Gale Storm was 87 years old at the time of her death

I Hear You Knocking Gale Storm

 Gale Storm - Ivory Tower

Gale Storm's Filmography & Discography continues on next page

Filmography
Murder, She Wrote (1 episode, 1989)
The Love Boat (1 episode, 1979)
Burke's Law (2 episodes, 1964-1965)
The Gale Storm Show (83 episodes, 1956-1960)
Shower of Stars (1 episode, 1957)
What's My Line? 11/17/1975 (Episode #388) (Season 9 Ep 12)Mystery Guest
The Ford Television Theatre (1 episode, 1955)
Celebrity Playhouse (1 episode, 1955)
Robert Montgomery Presents (1 episode, 1955)
My Little Margie (76 episodes, 1952-1955)
The Unexpected (1 episode, 1952)
Woman of the North Country (1952)
The Texas Rangers (1951)
Al Jennings of Oklahoma (1951)
The Bigelow Theatre (2 episodes, 1950-1951)
Hollywood Theatre Time (1950) TV series
Between Midnight and Dawn (1950)
The Underworld Story (1950)
Curtain Call at Cactus Creek (1950)
The Kid from Texas (1950)
Abandoned (1949)
Stampede (1949)
Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)
The Dude Goes West (1948)
It Happened on 5th Avenue (1947)
Swing Parade of 1946
Sunbonnet Sue (1945)
G.I. Honeymoon (1945)
Forever Yours (1945)
Where Are Your Children? (1943)
Campus Rhythm (1943)
Nearly Eighteen (1943)
Revenge of the Zombies (1943)
Cosmo Jones, Crime Smasher (1943)
Rhythm Parade (1942)
Foreign Agent (1942)
Smart Alecks (1942)
Lure of the Islands (1942)
Man from Cheyenne (1942)
Freckles Comes Home (1942)
Red River Valley (1941)
Jesse James at Bay (1941)
Let's Go Collegiate (1941
Gambling Daughters (1941)
Saddlemates (1941)
City of Missing Girls (1941)
Merry-Go-Roundup (1941)
Uncle Joe (1941)
One Crowded Night (1940)
Tom Brown's School Days (1940)

Recordings

Singles
1956: I Hear You Knocking/Never Leave Me (Dot 15412) (#2)
1956: Memories Are Made of This/Teenage Prayer (Dot 15436)
1956: Why Do Fools Fall in Love/I Walk Alone (Dot 15448)
1956: I Ain't Gonna Worry/Ivory Tower (Dot 15458) (#6)
1956: Tell Me Why/Don't Be That Way (Dot 15474)
1956: Now Is The Hour/A Heart Without A Sweetheart (Dot 15492)
1956: My Heart Belongs To You/Orange Blossoms (Dot 15515)
1957: Lucky Lips/On Treasure Island (Dot 15539)
1957: Dark Moon/A Little Too Late (Dot 15558) (#4)
1957: On My Mind Again/Love By The Jukebox Light (Dot 15606)
1957: Go 'Way From My Window/Winter Warm (Dot 15666)
1957: I Get That Feeling/A Farewell To Arms (Dot 15691)
1957: You/Angry (Dot 15734)
1957: South Of The Border/Soon I'll Wed My Love (Dot 15783 )
1958: Oh Lonely Crowd/Happiness Left Yesterday (Dot 15861)
1960: I Need You So/On Treasure Island (Dot 16057)
1960: Please Help Me I'm Falling/He Is There (Dot 16111)

James Whitmore, Emmy, Golden Globe & Tony Winner, dies 87

1949 Battleground, best supporting actor2000 The Practice - Outstanding Guest Actor 

James Allen Whitmore, Jr. (October 1, 1921 - February 6, 2009) was an American two-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning film actor.

Death of Jame Whitmore
Whitmore was diagnosed with lung cancer in November of 2008. He died of the disease, at his home in Malibu, California,
James Whitmore was 87 years old at the time of his death.

Biography
Following World War II, Whitmore appeared on Broadway in the role of the Sergeant in Command Decision. MGM hired Whitmore on contract, however his role in the film was played by Van Johnson. Whitmore's first major movie was Battleground that was turned down by Spencer Tracy, for which Whitmore was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Other major films included The Asphalt Jungle, The Next Voice You Hear, Above and Beyond, Kiss Me, Kate, Them!, Oklahoma!, Black Like Me, Guns of the Magnificent Seven, Tora! Tora! Tora!, and Give 'em Hell, Harry!, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of former President of the United States Harry S Truman.

To a younger generation, he was probably best known, in addition to his role in The Shawshank Redemption, as the commercial spokesman for Miracle-Gro plant food for many years.

Brooks Commits Suicide - James Whitmore as Brooks

James Whitmore's Filmography continues next page

James Whitmore's Filmography 

The Majestic (2001)
Here s To Life (2000)
Behind the Planet of the Apes (1998)
The Relic (1997)
Wild Bill, Hollywood Maverick: The Life and Times of William A. Wellman (1996)
The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
Where The Red Fern Grows - Pt. 1 & 2 (1992)
Old Explorers (1990)
Glory! Glory! (1988)
All My Sons (1987)
Frontier Heritage (1987)
Nuts (1987)
Celebrity (1985)
The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985)
The Killing of Randy Webser (1981)
Rage (1980)
The First Deadly Sin (1980)
Bully (1978)
The Word (1978)
The Serpent's Egg (1977)
Give 'Em Hell, Harry! (1975)
I Will Fight No More Forever (1975)
Where the Red Fern Grows (1974)
High Crime (1973)
The Harrad Experiment (1973)
Chato's Land (1971)
Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970)
Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969)
Madigan (1968)
Nobody's Perfect (1968)
Planet of the Apes (1968)
Chuka (1967)
Waterhole Number 3 (1967)
Black Like Me (1964)
Who Was That Lady? (1960)
Face of Fire (1959)
The Restless Years (1958)
The Deep Six (1957)
Crime in the Streets (1956)
The Eddy Duchin Story (1956)
The Last Frontier (1956)
Battle Cry (1955)
Oklahoma! (1955)
The McConnell Story (1955)
Them (1954)
All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953)
Kiss Me Kate (1953)
The Girl Who Had Everything (1953)
The Great Diamond Robbery (1953)
Above and Beyond (1952)
Because You're Mine (1952)
The Next Voice You Hear (1950)
Battleground (1949)
Ray Bradbury Dancing Among the Muses

Connie Haines, almost forgotten Jazz star dies 87

** Connie Haines' mother Mildred JaMais is still alive at 109 years of age.

Yvonne Marie Antoinette JaMais (January 20, 1921 – September 22, 2008) was an American singer who performed under the stage name Connie Haines. Her 200 recordings were frequently up-tempo big band songs with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and Frank Sinatra.

Life and career
She began performing at age 4, and by age 9 had a regular radio show performing as Baby Yvonne Marie, the Little Princess of the Air.

After a number of regional successes and winning the Major Bowes contest, she was hired by Harry James, who asked her to change her name. She and James both later joined Tommy Dorsey, and Haines credited Dorsey with developing her style further. Haines performed in a number of films, including Duchess of Idaho.

She died in Clearwater Beach, Florida of myasthenia gravis.

Cyd Charisse, actress, dancer, legend dies 87

Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Cyd CharisseCyd Charisse (March 8, 1922 – June 17, 2008) was an American dancer and actress.

Death of Cyd Charisse
In her eighties, Cyd Charisse made occasional public appearances and appeared frequently in documentaries spotlighting the golden age of Hollywood.

Publicist Gene Schwam said Charisse was admitted to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center on June 16, 2008 after suffering an apparent heart attack. She died the following day, aged 86.

Honors
On November 9, 2006, in a private White House ceremony, President George W. Bush presented Cyd Charisse with the National Medal of the Arts and Humanities, the highest official U.S. honor available in the arts

Leona Helmsley

Leona HelmsleyLeona Helmsley (July 4, 1920 – August 20, 2007) was a billionaire New York City hotel operator and real estate investor. She was a flamboyant personality and had a reputation for tyrannical behavior that earned her the nickname "Queen of Mean." The image of Helmsley was sealed when a former housekeeper testified that she heard Helmsley say: "We don't pay taxes. Only the little people pay taxes." She was convicted of federal income tax evasion and other crimes in 1989 and served 19 months in prison (and two more months in house arrest), after receiving an initial sentence of 16 years.

Death

Leona Helmsley died from congestive heart failure, at the age of 87, on August 20, 2007, at her summer home in Greenwich, Connecticut Cardiovascular disease ran in her family, claiming the lives of her father, son and a sister. After a week at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel, she was entombed next to Harry Helmsley in a mausoleum constructed for $1.4 million and set on 3/4 acre in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Westchester County, New York.

### 

I grew up in the 80's. I probably heard Johnny Carson cracking jokes about Leona Helmsley about thousand times.

She was a great person in a way.  She started out as a secretary, then took over the industry.  I wish I was like that.

Then she made some bad decisions later in her life.

She must have been lonely, because she left 12 million dollars to her dog.

 

Jack Palance - Academy Award winning actor dies 87, 2006

Hollywood Walk of FamerOscar Award winnerGolden Glove award winner

Jack PalanceJack Palance (born Volodymyr Palahniuk; February 18, 1919 – November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. With his rugged facial features, Palance was best known to modern movie audiences as both the characters of Curly and Duke in the two City Slickers movies, but his career spanned half a century of film and television appearances.

Death of Jack Palance
Jack Palance died at the age of 87, of natural causes, at his home in Montecito in Santa Barbara County.He was cremated and his ashes were retained by family and friends

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  • Jack Palance's filmography continues on next page

Jack Palance as a bad guy

Hollywood Walk of Fame
Palance has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6608 Hollywood Boulevard. In 1992, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Academy award and nominations
1952 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Sudden Fear
1953 – Nominated – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – Shane
1992 – Won – Best Actor in a Supporting Role – City Slickers

Complete Filmography of Jack Palace

(1950-2004) (In order of production)

YearMovie title
1950Panic In The Streets
Halls of Montezuma
1952Shane
Sudden Fear
1953Second Chance
Flight To Tangier
Arrowhead
The Man In The Attic
1954Sign Of The Pagan
The Silver Chalice
1955Kiss of Fire
The Big Knife
I Died A Thousand Times
1956Attack
1957The Lonely Man
House Of Numbers
Flowers Of Mayo
1958The Man Inside
Ten Seconds To Hell
1959The Battle Of Austerlitz
1960Treno Di Natale
The Barbarian
1961The Mongols
The Last Judgement
Barabbas
1962Sword Of The Conqueror
Warriors Five
1963Contempt
Night Train To Milan
1965Once A Thief
The Spy In The Green Hat
1966The Professionals
1967To Kill A Dragon
Torture Garden
1968They Came To Rob Las Vegas
The Mercenary
The Battle Giants
Marquis De Sade: Justine
1969The Desperados
The Legion Of The Damned
Che
The McMasters
1970Monte Walsh
The Companeros
The Horsemen
1971Chato's Land
It Can Be Done, Amigo
1972Tedeum
The Short & Happy Life Of The Brothers Blue
1973Oklahoma Crude
1974Craze
1975The Four Deuces
The Great Adventure
Africa Express
1976Eva Nera
The Cop In Blue Jeans
Knell-The Bloody Avenger
Safari Express
Rulers Of The City
The Sensuous Nurse
God's Gun
1977Welcome To Blood City
Portrait Of A Hitman
1978One Man Jury
Angels Brigade
1979Cocaine Cowboys
The Shape Of Things To Come
1980Without Warning
Hawk The Slayer
1982Alone In The Dark
1987Gor
Bagdad Cafe
Outlaw Of Gor
1988Young Guns
1989Batman
Tango & Cash
1990Solar Crisis
City Slickers
1991Radio Flyer (Voice)
1992Eli's Lesson
1993Cyborg 2 - The Glass Shadow
City Slickers II: The Legend of Curly's Gold
1994Cops & Robbersons
The Swan Princess (Voice)
1998The Incredible Adventures Of Marco Polo
Treasure Island
2001Prancer Returns

Television Movies/Mini-Series

YearTelevision title
1968The Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
1973Dracula
1974The Godchild
The Hatfields & The McCoys
1975Bronk
1979The Last Ride Of The Dalton Gang
The Ivory Ape
1980The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story
1992Keep The Change
1993The Twilight Zone: Rod Serling's Lost Classics
1995Buffalo Girls
1997I'll Be Home For Christmas
Ebenezer
1999Sarah, Plain & Tall : Winters End
2001Living With The Dead
2004Back When We Were Grownups

Television Shows

YearTelevision title
1950Lights Out - The Man Who Couldn't Remember
1952Studio 1 - The King In Yellow
Curtain Call - Azaya
Studio 1 - Little Man, Big World
The Gulf Playhouse - The Necktie Party
1953Danger - Said The Spider To The Fly
The Web - Last Chance
Suspense - The Kiss Off
The Motorola Tv Hour - Brandenburg Gate
Suspense - Cagliostro & The Chess Player
1956Playhouse 90 - Requiem For A Heavyweight
Zane Grey Theatre - The Lariat
1957Playhouse 90 - The Last Tycoon
Playhouse 90 - The Death Of Manolete
1963The Greatest Show On Earth
1965Convoy - The Many Colours Of Courage
1966Run For Your Life - The Late Diana Hayes
Alice Through The Looking Glass - (Live Theatre)
1971Net Playhouse - Trail Of Tears
1973The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour
1979Buck Rogers In The 25th Century - The Planet Of The Slave Girls
Unknown Powers (Presenter/Narrator)
1981Tales Of The Haunted - Evil Stalks This House
1982Ripley's Believe It Or Not (Series)
2001Night Visions - Bitter Harvest

Red Buttons - Comedian, Actor, dies 87

Hollywood Walk of FameOscar WinnerGolden Globe Winner 

Red ButtonsRed Buttons (February 5, 1919 – July 13, 2006) was an American comedian and actor.

Death of Red Buttons
Red Buttons died of vascular disease on July 13, 2006 at his home in the Century City area of Los Angeles. Red Buttons was 87 years old. Buttons had been ill for some time and was with family members when he passed away

Early life
Red Buttons was born Aaron Chwatt on February 5, 1919 in New York City to Jewish immigrants. At sixteen years old, Buttons got a job as an entertaining bellhop at Ryan's Tavern in City Island, Bronx. The combination of his red hair and the shiny buttoned bellhop uniform inspired orchestra leader Charles "Dinty" Moore to call him Red Buttons, the name under which he would later perform.

Later that same summer, Buttons worked on the Borscht Belt; his straight man was Robert Alda. In 1939, Buttons started working for Minsky's Burlesque; in 1941, José Ferrer chose Buttons to appear in a Broadway show The Admiral Had a Wife. The show was a farce set in Pearl Harbor, and it was due to open on December 8, 1941. It never did, as it was deemed inappropriate after the Japanese attack. In later years Buttons would joke that the Japanese only attacked Pearl Harbor to keep him off Broadway.

  • Red Buttons' Biography & Filmography continues next page
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Career
In September 1942, Buttons at last got his Broadway debut in Vickie with Ferrer and Uta Hagen. Later that year, he appeared in the Minsky's show Wine, Women and Song; this was the last Burlesque show in New York City history, as the Mayor La Guardia administration closed it down. Buttons was on stage when the show was raided.

1943 saw Buttons in the Army Air Corps. He was chosen to appear in the Broadway show Winged Victory, as well as appearing in the Darryl F. Zanuck movie version. He later went on to entertain troops in the European Theater of operations in the same unit as Mickey Rooney.

After the war, Buttons continued to do Broadway shows. He also performed at Broadway movie houses with the Big Bands. In 1952, Buttons received his own variety series on television - The Red Buttons Show ran for three years, and achieved high levels of success. His catch phrase from the show, "strange things are happening," entered the national vocabulary briefly in the mid-1950s.

His role in Sayonara was a dramatic departure from his previous work. In that film, he played Joe Kelly, an American airman stationed in Kobe, Japan during the Korean War, who falls in love with Katsumi, a Japanese woman (played by Miyoshi Umeki), but is barred from marrying her by military rules intended to reassure the local populace that the U.S. presence is temporary. His portrayal of Kelly's calm resolve not to abandon the relationship and touching reassurance of Katsumi impressed audiences and critics alike; both he and Umeki won Academy Awards for the film. After his Oscar-winning role, Buttons performed in numerous feature films, including Hatari!, The Longest Day, Harlow, The Poseidon Adventure, They Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Pete's Dragon, and 18 Again! with George Burns. Buttons also made many memorable TV appearances on programs including Little House on the Prairie, It's Garry Shandling's Show, ER and Roseanne.

He became a nationally recognizable comedian, and his "Never Got A Dinner" sketch was a standard at the Dean Martin roasts for many years.

Number 71 on Comedy Central's list of the 100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time, Buttons received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for television, located at 1651 Vine Street.

Personal life
Buttons was married to actress Roxanne Arlen in 1947, but it soon ended in divorce. His next marriage was to Helayne McNorton, from December 8, 1949 until 1963. His last marriage was to Alicia Pratt, which lasted from January 27, 1964 until her death in March 2001. Buttons had two children, daughter Amy Buttons and son Adam Buttons. He was the advertising spokesman for the Century Village, Florida retirement community.

Buttons was an early member of the Synagogue for the Performing Arts, and at the time, Rabbi Jerome cutler was the Rabbi.

YearFilmRoleOther notes
1947Winged VictoryWhitey/Andrews Sisteras Cpl. Red Buttons
13 Rue MadeleineSecond Jump Masteruncredited
1951Footlight VarietiesHimself
1957SayonaraAirman Joe KellyAcademy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
Nominated - BAFTA Award for most promising newcomer
1958Imitation GeneralCpl. Chan Derby 
1959The Big CircusRandy Sherman 
1961One, Two, ThreeMP sergeantuncredited
1962Hatari!Pockets 
Five Weeks in a BalloonDonald O'Shay 
The Longest DayPvt. John Steele 
Gay Purr-eeRobespierrevoice
1963A Ticklish AffairUncle Cy 
1964Your Cheatin' HeartShorty Younger 
1965Up from the BeachPfc. Harry Devine 
HarlowArthur LandauNominated - Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
1966StagecoachPeacock 
1969The MoviemakersHimselfshort subject
They Shoot Horses, Don't They?SailorNominated - Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
1971Who Killed Mary What's 'Er Name?Mickey 
1972The Poseidon AdventureJames Martin 
1976Gable and LombardIvan Cooper 
1977Viva Knievel!Ben Andrews 
Pete's DragonHoagy 
1978Movie MoviePeanuts/Jinks Murphy 
1979C.H.O.M.P.S.Bracken 
1980When Time Ran OutFrancis Fendly 
1985Alice in WonderlandThe White Rabbit 
198818 Again!Charlie 
1990The AmbulanceElias Zacharai 
1994It Could Happen to YouWalter Zakuto 
1999The Story of UsArnie Jordan 
2001Odessa or BustThe Old Manshort subject
2004Goodnight, We Love You documentary
2005Sid Bernstein Presents...Himselfdocumentary

Loretta Young - Movie Legend, Oscar winner, 2 stars in walk of fame

Hollywood Walk of FameHollywood Walk of Fame Academy Best Actress 1947Emmy award winnerEmmy award winnerEmmy award winnergolden globe award winnergolden globe award winner

Loreta Young DVDLoretta Young MovieLoretta Young Show
Buy from Amazon.com: Loretta Young DVDs

Loretta Young Dead ActressLoretta Young (January 6, 1913 – August 12, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American actress.

Early life
She was born in Salt Lake City, Utah as Gretchen Young (she took the name Michaela at confirmation) she moved with her family to Hollywood when she was three years old. Loretta and her sisters Polly Ann Young and Elizabeth Jane Young (screen name Sally Blane) worked as child actresses, of whom Loretta was the most successful. Young's first role was at age 3 in the silent film The Primrose Ring. The movie's star Mae Murray so fell in love with little Gretchen that she wanted to adopt her. Although her mother declined, Gretchen was allowed to live with Murray for two years. Her half-sister Georgiana (daughter of her mother and stepfather George Belzer) eventually married actor Ricardo Montalban. During her high school years, she was educated at Ramona Convent Secondary School.

Death of Loretta young
Loretta young died of ovarian cancer at the Santa Monica, California home of her half-sister, Georgiana Montalban, and was interred in the family plot in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California.
Loretta young was 87 years old at the time of her death

Young has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame — one for motion pictures, at 6104 Hollywood Blvd, and another for television, at 6141 Hollywood Blvd.

Loretta Young Newsreel

Loreta Young DVDLoretta Young MovieLoretta Young Show
Buy from Amazon.com: Loretta Young DVDs

Career
She was billed as "Gretchen Young" in the 1917 film, Sirens of the Sea. It wasn't until 1928 that she was first billed as "Loretta Young", in The Whip Woman. That same year she co-starred with Lon Chaney in the MGM film Laugh, Clown, Laugh.The next year, she was anointed one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars.

In 1930, Young, then 17, eloped with 26-year-old actor Grant Withers and married him in Yuma, Arizona. The marriage was annulled the next year, just as their second movie together (ironically titled Too Young to Marry) was released.

Young made as many as seven or eight movies a year and won an Oscar in 1947 for her performance in The Farmer's Daughter. The same year she co-starred with Cary Grant and David Niven in The Bishop's Wife, a perennial favorite that still airs on television during the Christmas season and was later remade as The Preacher's Wife with Whitney Houston. In 1949, Young received another Academy Award nomination (for Come to the Stable) and in 1953 appeared in her last film, It Happens Every Thursday.

Moving to television, she hosted and starred in the well-received half hour anthology series The Loretta Young Show. Her "sweeping" trademark appearance at the beginning of each show was to appear dramatically in various high fashion evening gowns. She returned at the program's conclusion to restate to the viewer the moral of the story just seen. (Young's introductions and conclusions to her television shows, which were widely satirized at the time, are not rerun on television because she had it legally stipulated that they not be; the ever image-conscious Young didn't want to be seen in "outdated" wardrobe and hairstyles.) Her program ran in prime time on NBC for eight years, the longest-running prime time network program ever hosted by a woman up to that time.

The program, which earned her three Emmys, began with the premise that each drama was an answer to a question asked in her fan mail; the program's original title was Letter to Loretta. The title was changed to The Loretta Young Show during the first season, and the "letter" concept was dropped altogether at the end of the second season. At this time, Young's health required that there be a number of guest hosts and guest stars; her first appearance in the 1955-56 season was for the Christmas show. From this point on, Young appeared in only about half of each season's shows as an actress and merely functioned as the program host for the remainder. This program, minus Young's introductions and summarized conclusions, was rerun in daytime by NBC from 1960 to 1964 and also appeared, again without the introductions and conclusions, in syndication.

Affair with Clark Gable
In 1935, Young had an affair with Clark Gable, who was married at the time, while on location for The Call of the Wild. During their relationship, Young became pregnant. Due to the moral codes placed on the film industry Young covered up her pregnancy in order to avoid damaging her career (as well as Gable's). Returning from a long "vacation" (during which she secretly gave birth to her daughter), Young announced that she had adopted the little girl. The child was raised as "Judy Lewis" after taking the name of Young's second husband, producer Tom Lewis. According to Lewis's autobiography Uncommon Knowledge, Lewis was made fun of because of the ears that she received from her father, Clark Gable. Over the years she had heard rumors and secretly knew that Clark Gable was her biological father, but it was not until 1958 when Judy's future husband Joseph Tinney told her that "everybody" knew the rumors that she really began to suspect. It was not until a few years later, after becoming a mother herself, that she finally got the nerve to ask her mother, who, after promptly vomiting, admitted to her that Clark Gable was her father and the she was "a mortal sin."

Marriages and relationships
Married to actor Grant Withers from 1930-1931.
Married producer Tom Lewis in 1940 and they divorced very bitterly in the mid 1960s. Lewis died in 1988. They had two sons, Peter (Peter Lewis of the legendary San Francisco rock band Moby Grape) and Christopher, a film director.
Married fashion designer Jean Louis in 1993. Louis died in 1997.
Involved in affairs with Spencer Tracy and Clark Gable; in 1935, she gave birth to Gable's daughter, who was known as Judy Lewis.

Later life
Loretta Young was the godmother of actress Marlo Thomas, whose parents (her father was Danny Thomas), were, like Young, devout Roman Catholics. From the time of Young's retirement in the 1960s, until not long before her death, she devoted herself to volunteer work for charities and churches with her friend of many years, Jane Wyman. Young did, however, briefly come out of retirement to star in two television films, Christmas Eve (1986), and Lady in a Corner (1989). Young was the mother of Peter Lewis, guitarist and vocalist of seminal 60's San Francisco underground rock band Moby Grape.

Young died at 87 from ovarian cancer at the Santa Monica, California home of her half-sister, Georgiana Montalban, and was interred in the family plot in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California.

Young has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame — one for motion pictures, at 6104 Hollywood Blvd, and another for television, at 6141 Hollywood Blvd.

Filmography

YearFilmRole
1917The Primrose RingFairy
Sirens of the SeaChild
1919The Only WayChild on the operating table
1921White and UnmarriedChild
The SheikArab child
1927Naughty But NiceBit Part
Her Wild OatBit by Ping Pong Table
1928The Whip WomanThe Girl
Laugh, Clown, LaughSimonetta
The Magnificent FlirtDenise Laverne
The Head ManCarol Watts
Scarlet SeasMargaret Barbour
1929Seven Footprints to SatanOne of Satan's victims
The SquallIrma
The Girl in the Glass CageGladys Cosgrove
Fast LifePatricia Mason Stratton
The Careless AgeMuriel
The Forward PassPatricia Carlyle
The Show of Shows 
1930Loose AnklesAnn Harper Berry
The Man from Blankley'sMargery Seaton
Show Girl in HollywoodHerself, Cameo Appearance at Premiere
The Second Floor MysteryMarion Ferguson
Road to ParadiseMary Brennan/Margaret Waring
Warner Bros. Jubilee DinnerHerself
KismetMarsinah
War NurseNurse
The Truth About YouthPhyllis Ericson
The Devil to Pay!Dorothy Hope
1931How I Play Golf, by Bobby Jones No. 8: 'The Brassie'Loretta (uncredited)
Beau IdealIsobel Brandon
The Right of WayRosalie Evantural
The Stolen JoolsHerself (cameo)
Three Girls LostNorene McMann
Too Young to MarryElaine Bumpstead
Big Business GirlClaire 'Mac' McIntyre
I Like Your NerveDiane Forsythe
The Ruling VoiceGloria Bannister
Platinum BlondeGallagher
1932Taxi!Sue Riley Nolan
The Hatchet ManSun Toya San
Play-GirlBuster 'Bus' Green Dennis
Week-end MarriageLola Davis Hayes
Life BeginsGrace Sutton
They Call It SinMarion Cullen
1933Employees' EntranceMadeleine Walters West
Grand SlamMarcia Stanislavsky
Zoo in BudapestEve
The Life of Jimmy DolanPeggy
Heroes for SaleRuth Loring Holmes
Midnight MaryMary Martin
She Had to Say YesFlorence 'Flo' Denny
The Devil's in LoveMargot Lesesne
Man's CastleTrina
1934The House of RothschildJulie Rothschild
Born to Be BadLetty Strong
Bulldog Drummond Strikes BackLola Field
CaravanCountess Wilma
The White ParadeJune Arden
1935Clive of IndiaMargaret Maskelyne Clive
ShanghaiBarbara Howard
The Call of the WildClaire Blake
The CrusadesBerengaria, Princess of Navarre
Hollywood Extra GirlCrusades cast member
1936The Unguarded HourLady Helen Dudley Dearden
Private NumberEllen Neal
RamonaRamona
Ladies in LoveSusie Schmidt
1937Love Is NewsToni Gateson
Café MetropoleLaura Ridgeway
Love Under FireMyra Cooper
Wife, Doctor and NurseIna Heath Lewis
Second HoneymoonVickie Benton
1938Four Men and a PrayerMiss Lynn Cherrington
Three Blind MicePamela Charters
SuezCountess Eugenie de Montijo
KentuckySally Goodwin
1939Wife, Husband and FriendDoris Borland
The Story of Alexander Graham BellMrs. Mabel Bell
Eternally YoursAnita
1940The Doctor Takes a WifeJune Cameron
He Stayed for BreakfastMarianna Duval
1941The Lady from CheyenneAnnie Morgan
The Men in Her LifeLina Varsavina
Bedtime StoryJane Drake
1943A Night to RememberNancy Troy
ChinaCarolyn Grant
Show Business at WarHerself
1944Ladies CourageousRoberta Harper
And Now TomorrowEmily Blair
1945Along Came JonesCherry de Longpre
1946The StrangerMary Longstreet
1947The Perfect MarriageMaggie Williams
The Farmer's DaughterKatrin Holstrom
The Bishop's WifeJulia Brougham
1948Rachel and the StrangerRachel Harvey
1949The AccusedDr. Wilma Tuttle
Mother Is a FreshmanAbigail Fortitude Abbott
Come to the StableSister Margaret
1950Key to the CityClarissa Standish
1951You Can Change the WorldHerself
Cause for Alarm!Ellen Jones(Brown)/Narrator
Half AngelNora Gilpin
Screen Snapshots: Hollywood AwardsHerself
1952PaulaPaula Rogers
Because of YouChristine Carroll Kimberly
1953It Happens Every ThursdayJane MacAvoy

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