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Jackie Collins, best-selling author, dies 77

CollinsJacqueline Jill "Jackie" Collins OBE (4 October 1937 – 19 September 2015) was a British American romance novelist who moved to Los Angeles in the 1960s, where she lived, became a U.S. citizen and wrote most of her novels. She wrote 32 novels, all of which appeared on The New York Times bestsellers list. In total, her books have sold over 500 million copies and have been translated into 40 languages. Eight of her novels have been adapted for the screen, either as films or television mini-series. She was the younger sister of actress Joan Collins.

Jackie Collins cause of Death

Jackie Collins died on September 19, 2015 of breast cancer, two weeks before her 78th birthday. She had been diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer more than six years before her death but kept her illness almost entirely to herself. She reportedly only informed her sister two weeks before she died. and flew from Los Angeles to London to appear on the ITV chat show Loose Women only nine days before her death.

Tom Magliozzi, NPR's 'Car Talk', Dies 77

Thomas Louis Magliozzi (June 28, 1937 – November 3, 2014) and his brother Raymond F. Magliozzi (born March 30, 1949) were the co-hosts of NPR's weekly radio show, Car Talk, where they were known as "Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers". Their show was honored with a Peabody Award in 1992.

Tom Magliozzi cause of death

On November 3, 2014, Tom died in Belmont, Massachusetts, due to complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 77.

August Schellenberg, Free Willy actor, dies 77

August Schellenberg (July 25, 1936 – August 15, 2013) was a Canadian-born Métis actor.

His first film was Rip-Off in 1971. In 1981, he did voices for the animated film Heavy Metal. During the late '90s he had major roles in Black Robe (as Chomina), Free Willy and its sequels (as Randolph Johnson), Iron Will (Ned Dodd), and TV film Crazy Horse (Sitting Bull). He went on to star as Chief Powhatan in Terrence Malick's 2005 film The New World, alongside Colin Farrell, Q'orianka Kilcher, and Christian Bale. He also had roles in Disney's Eight Below and the doco within a film The Green Chain (2007). In 2011, he appeared in two episodes of the television series Stargate Universe as Yaozu.

August Schellenberg cause of death

Schellenberg died on August 15, 2013 at his home in Texas after a long battle with lung cancer.  August Schellenberg was 77 years old at the time of his death.

August Schellenberg. native actor

Jody Payne, Willie Nelson Guitarist, Singer, Dies 77

Jody Payne (January 11, 1936 – August 10, 2013) was an American country musician and singer. He is probably best known as a longtime guitarist in Willie Nelson's band, The Family.

He first met Willie Nelson in about 1962 in Detroit. Nelson was playing bass with Ray Price. Payne started working with Nelson in November 1973. Before that, he played for Merle Haggard.

After playing with Willie Nelson for 35 years he retired from Nelson's band in 2008.

Jody Payne cause of death

Jody Payne died from cardiac problems.  Jody Payne was 77 years old at the time of his death.

Up Against The Wall Redneck Mother - Jody Payne, Willie Nelson (1974)

Alex Karras, Actor, NFL Lineman, Pro-Wrestler, dies 77

Alex KarrasAlexander George "Alex" Karras (July 15, 1935 – October 10, 2012), nicknamed "The Mad Duck", was an American football player, professional wrestler, and actor. He played football with the Detroit Lions in the National Football League from 1958–1962 and 1964–1970. As an actor, Karras is noted for his role as the thuggish Mongo in the 1974 comedy film Blazing Saddles, and for starring in the ABC sitcom Webster (1983–89) alongside his wife Susan Clark, as the title character's adoptive father.

Professional wrestling
Before his NFL career got under way, Karras signed a contract as a professional wrestler on December 13, 1957, earning $25,000 during the six-month off-season.

NFL player
Karras was drafted in the first round of the NFL draft by the Detroit Lions in 1958. He quickly became one of the dominant defensive tackles in the NFL, playing for 12 seasons (1958-1962, 1964-1970) with the same team

He was known for his humorous endorsement of La-Z-Boy recliners.

Alex Karras cause of death
Alex Karras died in the morning hours of October 10 from complications caused by kidney failure.
Alex Karras was 77 years old at the time of his death.

In his later years, Karras suffered several serious health problems, including dementia, heart disease, and cancer.

Karras was among many former NFL players to have filed a lawsuit against the NFL in early 2012, over issues of head injuries during their career that had caused various ill effects later in their lives, including dementia.

On October 8, 2012, it was revealed by friend Tom McInerney that Karras had suffered from kidney failure; doctors gave him a few days to live. Karras was treated at the Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica, California, before being released into hospice care. After returning to his Los Angeles home with family.

Blazing Saddles - Alex Karras as Mongo

Ian Abercrombie, Mr. Pitt on 'Seinfeld,' Dies 77

Ian Abercrombie (September 11, 1934 - January 26, 2012) was an English actor, best known for playing Alfred Pennyworth in Birds of Prey. He appeared as Elaine Benes' fastidious boss, Justin Pitt during the sixth season of Seinfeld, and later as an even more fastidious butler on Desperate Housewives.

Ian Abercrombie Cause of Death
Ian Abercrombie died in Hollywood on 26 January 2012, from undisclosed causes. Ian Abercrombie was 77 years old at the time of his death.

Mr. Pitt

John Barry, James Bond composer dies 77

John Barry Prendergast, OBE (November 3, 1933 – January 30, 2011) was an Oscar winning English film score composer. He was best known for composing 11 James Bond soundtracks and was hugely influential on the 007 series' distinctive style.

In a career spanning almost 50 years, Barry received a number of awards for his work, including five Academy Awards; two for Born Free, and one each for The Lion in Winter (for which he also won a BAFTA Award), Out of Africa and Dances with Wolves (for which he also won a Grammy Award).

Death of John Barry
John Barry died of a heart attack on 30 January 2011 at his Oyster Bay home.
John Barry was 77 years old at the time of his death.

John Barry - Greatest Hits

 

Senator Ted Kennedy dies at age 77

Edward Moore "Ted" Kennedy (February 22, 1932 – August 26, 2009) was the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. In office since November 1962, Kennedy was in his eighth full (and ninth overall) term in the Senate. At the time of his death, he was the second most senior member of the Senate, after Robert Byrd of West Virginia, and the third-longest-serving senator of all time. For many years the most prominent living member of the Kennedy family, he was the youngest brother of President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, both victims of assassinations, and the father of Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy.

Death
On May 17, 2008, Kennedy suffered a seizure, and then another one as he was rushed from the Kennedy Compound to Cape Cod Hospital and then by helicopter to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. On May 20, doctors announced that Kennedy had a malignant glioma, a type of cancerous brain tumor.

Kennedy died on August 25, 2009 at his home in Hyannisport, Massachusetts.

* Comment disabled (for people of politics).

Character actor Robert Prosky dies 77

actor who died 2008Robert Prosky (December 13, 1930 - December 8, 2008) was an American actor with hundreds of credits on stage and screen including "Mrs. Doubtfire" and "Hill Street Blues"

Death of Robert Prosky
Robert Prosky died on December 8, 2008, five days short of his 78th birthday, of complications following a heart procedure. At the time of his death, he lived on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

Biography
Robert Prosky appeared in such films as Thief, Christine, The Natural, Broadcast News, Green Card, Hoffa, Rudy, and Dead Man Walking. In addition to appearing in numerous films, Prosky appeared as a regular on the television shows Hill Street Blues and Veronica's Closet. Prior to his film and television career, Prosky appeared in numerous productions at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC, most notably as Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman. He was considered for the role of Martin Crane in Frasier and later made a guest appearance in the show as a reclusive writer. He also played Rebecca Howe's father on Cheers.

Prosky often performed at Arena Stage in Washington, DC, with over 100 stage credits to his name at that theatre alone. He also originated the role of Shelly Levene in David Mamet's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Glengarry Glen Ross.

Robert Prosky's biography continues next page

Filmography
The Skeptic (2009)
Suits on the Loose (2005)
D-Tox (2002) - McKenzie
Death to Smoochy (2002) (uncredited)
Dudley Do-Right (1999) - Inspector Fenwick
Veronica's Closet (1997) (TV series) (1997–1998)
The Chamber (1996)
Dead Man Walking (1995)
The Scarlet Letter (1995) - Horace Stonehall
Miracle on 34th Street (1994) - Judge Henry Harper
Mrs. Doubtfire (1993) - Jonathan Lundy
Rudy (1993) - Father Cavanaugh
Last Action Hero (1993)
Hoffa (1992)
Far and Away (1992) - Daniel Christie
Green Card (1990)
Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990)
The Great Outdoors (1988)
Outrageous Fortune (1987) - Stanislav Korzenowski
Broadcast News (1987)
Hill Street Blues (1981) (TV series) (1984–1987)
The Natural (1984)
The Keep (1983)
Christine (1983)
The Lords of Discipline (1983)
Monsignor (1982)
Hanky Panky (1982)
Thief (1981)

Bernie Brillstein - Agent, manager, producer dies 77

Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Bernard J. "Bernie" Brillstein (April 26, 1931, in New York City, New York - August 7, 2008, in Los Angeles, California) was an American film and television producer and executive producer.

Death of Bernard Brillstein:
On the evening of August 7, 2008, around 9:00pm, Brillstein died of chronic pulmonary heart disease at a Los Angeles hospital.[4] He is survived by his wife Carrie, daughter Leigh and Kate Brillstein, and three sons Michael Brillstein, David and Nick Koskoff.

Bernard Brillstein formed The Brillstein Company in 1969. There, he continued to manage stars and develop television programming. He produced such popular television hits as Hee Haw, The Muppet Show and Saturday Night Live.

Bernard Brillstein later became manager of SNL alums Gilda Radner , John Belushi and Lorne Michaels, as well as Jim Henson (of Muppets fame) and Paul Fusco (voice and operator of ALF). He produced such other television shows as Alf: The Animated Series, and Normal Life.

Bernard Brillstein has been responsible for such successes as The Blues Brothers, Ghostbusters, Dragnet, Ghostbusters II, Happy Gilmore and The Cable Guy.

Bernard Brillstein received the honor as recipient of a star on Hollywood Walk of Fame, on April 18, 2001.

Brillstein Quote. "...you're no one in this business, unless someone wants you dead."

Tito Puente - Mambo King, Latin Jazz, died 2000

Hollywood Walk of Famer 

Tito Puente CD Death Latin Jazz
Buy from Amazon: Tito Puente CD 

Tito Puente's DeathTito Puente, Sr., (April 20, 1923 – May 31, 2000 or June 1, 2000 according to IMDb), born Ernesto Antonio Puente, Jr., was an influential Latin jazz and mambo musician. The son of native Puerto Ricans Ernest and Ercilia Puente, of Spanish Harlem in New York City, Puente is often credited as "El Rey" (the King) of the timbales and "The King of Latin Music". He is best known for dance-oriented mambo and Latin jazz compositions that helped keep his career going for 50 years. He and his music appear in many films such as The Mambo Kings and Fernando Trueba's Calle 54. He guest starred on several television shows including The Cosby Show and The Simpsons.

Death of Tito Puente
Tito Puente Died of a heart attack
Tito Puente was 77 years old at the time of his death.

Tito Puente on Sesame Street

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Tito Puente CD Death Latin Jazz
Buy from Amazon: Tito Puente CD  

Biography
Tito Puente Sr. served in the Navy for three years during World War II after being drafted in 1942. He was discharged with a Presidential Commendation for serving in nine battles. The GI Bill allowed him to study music at Juilliard School of Music, where he completed a formal education in conducting, orchestration and theory. In 1969, he received the key to the City of New York from former Mayor John Lindsay. In 1992 he was inducted into the National Congressional Record, and in 1993 he received the Smithsonian Medal.

During the 1950s, Puente was at the height of his popularity, and helped to bring Afro-Cuban and Caribbean sounds, like mambo, son, and cha-cha-cha, to mainstream audiences (he was so successful playing popular Afro-Cuban rhythms that many people mistakenly identify him as Cuban). Dance Mania, possibly Puente's most well known album was released in 1958.[1] Later, he moved into more diverse sounds, including pop music, bossa nova and others, eventually settling down with a fusion of Afro-Cuban and Latin jazz genres that became known as "salsa" (a term that he disliked). In 1979 Puente won the first of five Grammy Awards for the albums A Tribute to Benny Moré, On Broadway, Mambo Diablo, and Goza Mi Timbal. In 1990, Puente was awarded the "James Smithson Bicentennial Medal." He was also awarded a Grammy at the first Latin Grammy Awards, winning Best Traditional Tropical Album for Mambo Birdland. He was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.

After a heart attack following a show in Puerto Rico, Puente had heart surgery in New York City, from which he never recovered. He died on May 31, 2000, just a few months after shooting for the music video Calle 54, in which Puente was wearing all-white outfit with his band

Honors
During the presidency of Sen. Roberto Rexach Benítez, Tito Puente received the unique honor of not only having a special session of the Senate of Puerto Rico dedicated to him, but being allowed to perform in his unique style on the floor of the Senate while it was in session.

On September 10, 2007, a United States Post Office in Harlem was named after him at a ceremony presided by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charles Rangel (D-NY) and Rep. José Serrano (D-NY).

Discography - too long to list here, Tito Puente is a legend

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Charles Schulz, creator of Peanuts Comic Strip

Peanuts Moviescharles schulz peanuts dvd
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Charles Schulz Cartoonist's DeathCharles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip.

Charles M. Schulz was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and grew up in Saint Paul. He was the only child of Carl Schulz, who was German, and Dena, who was Norwegian. His uncle nicknamed him "Sparky" after the horse Spark Plug in the Barney Google comic strip.

Schulz attended St. Paul's Richard Gordon Elementary School, where he skipped two half-grades. He became a shy and isolated teenager, perhaps as a result of being the youngest in his class at Central High School.

Charles Schulz's death.
Charles Schulz died in Santa Rosa of complications from colon cancer at 9:45 p.m. on February 12, 2000.  Charles Schulz was 77 years old at the time of his death. He was interred in Pleasant Hills Cemetery in Sebastopol.

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Charles Schulz' Biography continues 

After his mother died in February 1943, he was drafted into the United States Army and was sent to Camp Campbell in Kentucky. He was shipped to Europe two years later to fight in World War II as an infantry squad patrol with the U.S. 20th Armored Division.

After leaving the army in 1945, he returned to Minneapolis where he took a job as an art teacher at Art Instruction, Inc. — he had taken correspondence courses before he was drafted. Schulz, before having his comics published, began doing lettering work for a Catholic comic magazine titled Timeless Topix, where he would rush back and forth from dropping off his lettering work and teaching at Art Instruction Schools, Inc.

Schulz's drawings were first published by Robert Ripley in his Ripley's Believe It or Not!. His first regular cartoons, Li'l Folks, were published from 1947 to 1950 by the St. Paul Pioneer Press; he first used the name Charlie Brown for a character there, although he applied the name in four gags to three different boys and one buried in sand. The series also had a dog that looked much like Snoopy. In 1948, Schulz sold a cartoon to the Saturday Evening Post; the first of seventeen single-panel cartoons by Schulz that would be published there. In 1948, Schulz tried to have Li'l Folks syndicated through the Newspaper Enterprise Association. Schulz would have been an independent contractor for the syndicate, unheard of in the 1940s, but the deal fell through. Li'l Folks was dropped in January, 1950.

Later that year, Schulz approached the United Feature Syndicate with his best strips from Li'l Folks, and Peanuts made its first appearance on October 2, 1950. The strip became one of the most popular comic strips of all time. He also had a short-lived sports-oriented comic strip called It's Only a Game (1957 – 1959), but abandoned it due to the demands of the successful Peanuts. From 1956 to 1965 he also contributed a single-panel strip ("Young Pillars") featuring teenagers to Youth, a publication associated with the Church of God (Anderson).

Charlie Brown, the principal character for Peanuts, was named after a co-worker at the Art Instruction Schools; he drew much of his inspiration, however, from his own life:

Like Charlie Brown, Schulz's father was a barber and his mother a housewife.
Schulz had a dog when he was a boy. Unlike Snoopy the beagle, it was a pointer. Eventually, it was revealed that Snoopy had a desert-dwelling brother named Spike.
Spike's residence, outside of Needles, California, was likely influenced by the few years (1928 – 1930) that the Schulz family lived there; they had moved to Needles to join other family members who had relocated from Minnesota to tend to an ill cousin.

Schulz was also shy and withdrawn.

Schulz's "Little Red-Haired Girl" was Donna Johnson, an Art Instruction Schools accountant with whom he had a relationship. She rejected his marriage proposal, but remained a friend for the rest of his life.

Linus and Shermy were both named for good friends of his (Linus Maurer and Sherman Plepler, respectively).

Lucy was inspired by Joyce Halverson, his first wife.

Peppermint Patty was inspired by Patricia Swanson, one of his cousins on his mother's side.

Schulz moved briefly to Colorado Springs, Colorado. He painted a wall in that home for his daughter Meredith, featuring Patty, Charlie Brown and Snoopy. The wall was removed in 2001 and donated to the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, California. The restored artwork by Schulz is printed in the paperback edition of Chip Kidd's book Peanuts: The Art of Charles M. Schulz.

Schulz's family returned to Minneapolis and stayed until 1958. They then moved to Sebastopol, California, where Schulz built his first studio. It was here that Schulz was interviewed for the unaired television documentary A Boy Named Charlie Brown. Some of the footage was eventually used in a later documentary titled Charlie Brown and Charles Schulz. The original documentary is available on DVD from The Charles M. Schulz Museum.

Schulz's father died while visiting him in 1966, the same year his Sebastopol studio burned down. By 1969, Schulz had moved to Santa Rosa, California, where he lived and worked for more than 30 years.

Schulz had a long association with ice sports, as both figure skating and ice hockey featured prominently in his cartoons. In Santa Rosa, he was the owner of the Redwood Empire Ice Arena, which opened in 1969. Schulz's daughter Amy served as a model for the skating in the 1980 television special She's a Good Skate, Charlie Brown. Schulz also was very active in Senior Ice Hockey tournaments; in 1975, he formed Snoopy's Senior World Hockey Tournament at his Redwood Empire Ice Arena, and in 1981, Schulz was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for outstanding service to the sport of hockey in the United States. In 1998, he hosted the 1st ever Over 75 Hockey Tournament (although goalies could be younger - 60). In 2001, Saint Paul renamed The Highland Park Ice Arena the "Charles Schulz Arena" in his honor.

The first full-scale biography of Schulz, Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography, by David Michaelis, was released in October 2007. The book has been heavily criticized by the Schulz family, while Michaelis maintains that there is "no question" his work is accurate. However, fellow artist Bill Watterson (creator of Calvin & Hobbes) feels that the biography does justice to Schulz's legacy, while giving insight into the emotional impetus of the creation of the strips.

In light of David Michaelis' biography and the controversy surrounding his interpretation of the personality that was Charles Schulz, responses from his family reveal some intimate knowledge about the Schulz's persona beyond that of mere artist.

Death

Peanuts ran for nearly 50 years without interruption and appeared in more than 2,600 newspapers in 75 countries. In November 1999 Schulz suffered a stroke, and later it was discovered that he had colon cancer that had metastasized to his stomach. Because of the chemotherapy and the fact he could not read or see clearly, he announced his retirement on December 14, 1999. This was difficult for Schulz, and he was quoted as saying to Al Roker on The Today Show, "I never dreamed that this would happen to me. I always had the feeling that I would stay with the strip until I was in my early eighties, or something like that. But all of sudden it's gone. I did not take it away. This has been taken away from me."

Schulz died in Santa Rosa of complications from colon cancer at 9:45 p.m. on February 12, 2000, at age 77. He was interred in Pleasant Hills Cemetery in Sebastopol.

The last original strip ran the day after his death. In it, a statement was included from Schulz that his family wished for the strip to end when he was no longer able to produce it. Schulz had previously predicted that the strip would outlive him, with his reason being that comic strips are usually drawn weeks before their publication. As part of his will, Schulz had requested that the Peanuts characters remain as authentic as possible and that no new comic strips based on them be drawn. United Features has legal ownership of the strip, but his wishes have been honored, although reruns of the strip are still being syndicated to newspapers. New television specials have also been produced since Schulz's death, but the stories are based on previous strips.

Schulz had been asked if, for his final Peanuts strip, Charlie Brown would finally get to kick that football after so many decades. His response: "Oh, no! Definitely not! I couldn't have Charlie Brown kick that football; that would be a terrible disservice to him after nearly half a century."

He was honored on May 27, 2000, by cartoonists of 42 comic strips paying homage to him and Peanuts.

Awards

Schulz received the National Cartoonist Society Humor Comic Strip Award in 1962 for Peanuts, the Society's Elzie Segar Award in 1980, their Reuben Award for 1955 and 1964, and their Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999. He was also a hockey fan; in 1981, Schulz was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for outstanding contributions to the sport of hockey in the United States, and he was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 1993. On June 28, 1996, Schulz was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, adjacent to Walt Disney's. A replica of this star appears outside his former studio in Santa Rosa. Schulz is a recipient of the Silver Buffalo Award, the highest adult award given by the Boy Scouts of America, for his service to American youth.

On June 7, 2001 the United States Congress posthumously awarded Schulz the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian honor the US legislature can award. Schulz's widow, Jean, accepted the award on behalf of her late husband.

Schulz was inducted into the United States Figure Skating Hall of Fame in 2007.

Legacy

In 2000, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors rechristened the Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport in his honor. The airport's logo features Snoopy in goggles and scarf, taking to the skies on top of his red doghouse.

The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center in Santa Rosa opened on August 17, 2002, two blocks away from his former studio and celebrates his life's work and art of cartooning. A bronze statue of Charlie Brown and Snoopy stands in Depot Park in downtown Santa Rosa.

The Jean and Charles Schulz Information Center at Sonoma State University is one of the largest libraries in the CSU system and the state of California with a 400,000 volume general collection and with a 750,000 volume automated retrieval system capacity. The $41.5 million building was named after Schulz and his wife donated a large sum of the money, $5 million, needed to build and furnish the structure. The library opened in 2000 and now stands as one of the largest buildings in the university.

Peanuts on Parade has been Saint Paul, Minnesota’s tribute to its favorite native cartoonist. It began in 2000 with the placing of 101 five-foot tall statues of Snoopy throughout the city of Saint Paul. Every summer for the next 4 years statues of a different Peanuts character were placed on the sidewalks of Saint Paul. In 2001 there was Charlie Brown Around Town, 2002 brought Looking for Lucy, then in 2003 along came Linus Blankets Saint Paul, ending in 2004 with Snoopy lying on his doghouse. The statues were auctioned off at the end of each summer, so some remain around the city but others have been relocated. Permanent, bronze statues of the Peanuts character are also found in Landmark Plaza in downtown Saint Paul.

For the past five years, Forbes Magazine has rated Schulz the second "highest paid deceased person" in America (after Elvis Presley), with his estate continuing to garner income totaling more than $32 million since his passing. According to the book "Where Are They Buried?" (as well as other sources), Charles M. Schulz's income during his lifetime totaled more than $1.1 billion, a true testament to the impact Schulz had on three generations of Americans who grew up with the Peanuts gang and "good Ol' Charlie Brown."

Religion

Schulz touched on religious themes in his work, including the classic television cartoon, A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965), which features the character Linus van Pelt quoting the King James Version of the Bible Luke 2:8-14 to explain "what Christmas is all about." In personal interviews Schulz mentioned that Linus represented his spiritual side.

Schulz, reared in the Lutheran faith, had been active in the Church of God (Anderson) as a young adult and then later taught Sunday school at a United Methodist Church. But, he remained a member of the Church of God (Anderson) until his death.

In an interview in the late 1980s, however, Schulz stated that his philosophical views had evolved over the years:

I do not go to church anymore… I guess you might say I've come around to secular humanism, an obligation I believe all humans have to others and the world we live in."

In the 1960s, Robert L. Short interpreted certain themes and conversations in Peanuts as being consistent with parts of Christian theology, and used them as illustrations during his lectures about the gospel, and as source material for several books, as he explained in his bestselling paperback book, The Gospel According to Peanuts.

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